Russian Federation requests Interpol info on suspected spy location

U.S. President Donald Trump has been accused of revealing U.S. secrets during meetings with foreign officials

U.S. President Donald Trump has been accused of revealing U.S. secrets during meetings with foreign officials

- USA agents extracted a high-level mole in the Russian government who had confirmed Vladimir Putin's direct role in interfering in the 2016 presidential election, American media reported.

Russian Federation has reached out to Interpol in search of Oleg B. Smolenkov, a former Kremlin official who disappeared in 2017 and is now suspected of having spied for the Central Intelligence Agency, a top Moscow official said Thursday.

U.S. intelligence agencies have said Russian Federation interfered in the 2016 presidential election campaign in order to tilt the vote in U.S. President Donald Trump's favor.

On Monday, CNN presented a report that claimed the USA extracted one of their covert sources inside the Russian government in 2017 amid concerns that President Donald Trump "repeatedly mishandled classified intelligence".

Russian foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said Moscow had contacted Washington via the worldwide police organisation Interpol.

Russian state news agency RIA said on Wednesday it had visited a house listed as owned by a man named Oleg Smolenkov in Stafford, Virginia, near Washington D.C., an area where it said many former USA military and Federal Bureau of Investigation personnel live.

Instead of a superspy who saw Mr. Putin regularly and became "one of the C.I.A.'s most valuable assets", he is now being presented by Russian officials, state-controlled news outlets and pro-Kremlin newspapers as a boozy nobody with no access to Kremlin secrets.

Trump met with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov at the White House in May 2017
Trump met with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov at the White House in May 2017

The CNN news report, based on multiple anonymous Trump administration officials, says the extraction mission took place shortly after Trump met with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and Russia's former USA envoy Sergey Kislyak in May 2017.

Outlets operating under the Russian government's control responded to the reports by naming the likely Central Intelligence Agency mole as Mr. Smolenkov, a former member of President Vladimir Putin's administration who had reportedly disappeared while vacationing with his wife in Montenegro more than two years ago.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters on Wednesday: "I can only state that this employee existed, that he was sacked, and that we don't know whether he was a spy or not".

Zakharova called the U.S. reports "classic propaganda".

CNN reported that the source had been providing information for decades, had access to Putin and had sent pictures of high-level documents on the Russian leader's desk.

The informant reportedly confirmed to United States intelligence that Putin directed Russia's meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, straining superpower relations and casting a cloud over Donald Trump's stunning victory.

He drank too much, abandoned his sick, aged mother and - most important of all for Russian Federation in its own account of the man portrayed in the United States as a highly valued spy burrowed deep into the Kremlin - he had no contact whatsoever with President Vladimir V. Putin.