BA flights cancelled for another day

Heathrow's Terminal 5 was empty of passengers after a British Airways pilot strike led to 1700 flights being cancelled

Heathrow's Terminal 5 was empty of passengers after a British Airways pilot strike led to 1700 flights being cancelled

The UK Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) is investigating the airline after it enraged some travellers by wrongly telling them their flights had been cancelled.

British Airways was forced to cancel almost all of its flights Monday and Tuesday due to a 48-hour pilots' strike over pay.

British Airways (BA) pilots began a two-day strike on Monday, grounding almost all of its flights and disrupting thousands of passengers in a dispute over pay.

BA said it understood the frustration of passengers affected by the strike.

"After many months of trying to resolve the pay dispute, we are extremely sorry that it has come to this". "We urge BA to join us to discuss the new proposal - which shows pilots are willing to be flexible but still stand united in getting a better deal".

The British Airline Pilots Association (BALPA) is seeking higher salaries for pilots and has said that pilots "deserve a small fraction of that profit via, for instance, a profit share scheme". The pilots union put the cost of settling the strike at 5 million pounds, "one eighth of the cost of just one day's strike action", it said in the statement. The strike will involve 4,000 pilots and is expected to cause a loss of 40 million pounds (HUF 14.76 billion) a day to the airline. Indiver Rastogi of Thomas Cook said, "Due to advance intimation of the strike by British Airways, we offered alternate options to corporate travelers". A company spokesperson told The Post that the average captain earns the equivalent of more than $206,000 per year, plus another nearly $20,000 in flight allowances.

Faced with the prospect of a widespread pilot strike, British Airways is giving its customers some simple advice: "please do not go to the airport". A BA ad featuring Georgia May Jagger flanked by pilots.

More information is at https://www.britishairways.com/en-ca/information/incident/strike/latest-information.

The current demands relate to pay, profit sharing, and a share-awards program, and come after cockpit crew took salary cuts in the wake of the financial crisis to help bolster the airline's finances, according to the union.

The BALPA plans to strike once more on September 27.

British Airways planes sit parked at Heathrow Airport in London on Monday.

Customers with flights on Monday and Tuesday can rebook cancelled trips or claim a refund on the British Airways website.

On Friday, BA said that the "vast majority" of affected customers had now either accepted a refund or rebooked, either on alternative dates or with other airlines.

BA said: "We wanted to give our customers as much notice as possible so cancellations were made as soon as we received dates from BALPA".

Strutton said he simply didn't know how much support the pilots had among the travelling public, as they "get a range of mixed messages".