Team behind world's first black hole image wins 'Oscar of science'

Winners from the other categories life sciences and mathematics also took home $3 million

Winners from the other categories life sciences and mathematics also took home $3 million

France Cordova and Shepherd Doeleman look on as American computer scientist Katherine Bouman speaks on the "Event Horizon Telescope: The Black hole seen Round the World" in Washington, DC May 16, 2019.

The group of scientists who brought us the first image of a black hole has been awarded a major physics prize.

If that wasn't enough, the team, called Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration (EHT), will now be pocketing $3 million dollars.

Several UChicago researchers are involved in the EHT collaboration, and the 10 meter South Pole Telescope (SPT) is a critical component of the network of telescopes that make up the EHT.

Through this technique, they were able achieve an unprecedented resolution and observe the black hole's silhouette for the first time in history, confirming theoretical predictions about these celestial objects.

The event horizon of a black hole is the point at which its gravitational effects are strong that light can not escape its pull.

Yale's Arthur L. Horwich and colleague F. Ulrich Hartl from the Max Planck Institute will share the $3 million Breakthrough Prize, the richest prize in the sciences.

The Breakthrough Prize, now in its eighth year, has three main prizes: in Fundamental Physics, in Life Sciences and in Mathematics.

In addition to their new pocket money, the prize winners will all be honoured at a gala awards ceremony on November 3.