House Judiciary chairman says there are 'inconsistencies' in Hicks testimony

President Donald Trump attorney Michael Cohen and adult film actress Stormy Daniels. Search warrants unsealed Thursday

President Donald Trump attorney Michael Cohen and adult film actress Stormy Daniels. Search warrants unsealed Thursday

More: Before the White House, Trump faced an array of sexual misconduct accusations.

Former White House communications director Hope Hicks walks back to closed-door meeting with the House Judiciary Committee on June 19.

"Given the apparent inconsistencies between your testimony and this evidence, I would like to give you an opportunity to clarify your testimony on a voluntary basis, prior to our considering compulsory process", Nadler wrote in the letter.

New court filings show Hope Hicks, then press secretary of the 2016 Trump presidential campaign, might have been present for discussions about hush-money payments to Stormy Daniels, the adult-film actress who had claimed to have had an affair with Trump - potentially contradicting Hicks' June 2019 testimony to the House Judiciary Committee.

However, Hicks repeatedly denied to the Judiciary Committee last month that she knew anything about Stormy Daniels before reporters got wind of the story.

"The Committee is seeking to determine whether the internal Department of Justice policy against indicting a sitting President...played any role in your office's decision not to indict President Trump for these hush money crimes", the letter reads.

A footnote in the documents notes Hicks had previously told the Federal Bureau of Investigation, "to the best of her recollection, she did not learn about the allegations made by Clifford until early November 2016" though she was never asked by the Federal Bureau of Investigation about the call between Trump, Cohen, and herself.

On Thursday, a federal judge in NY unsealed FBI documents from spring 2018, shortly before agents raided Cohen's home, office and hotel room.

The campaign was already reeling from the release on October 7 of the 2005 "Access Hollywood" tape in which Trump bragged about grabbing women by the genitals.

According to the affidavit, phone records show that Hicks called Cohen the following evening; 16 seconds into the call, records show that Trump joined the call, which continued for an additional four minutes.

Cohen would have two further phone calls that evening with Hicks amid a flurry of calls with executives from American Media Inc, which publishes the National Enquirer and helped bury bad press for Trump by buying the rights to unflattering stories.

In the documents, Federal Bureau of Investigation agents laid out evidence they had gathered indicating that Cohen had made an illegal campaign contribution when he arranged a $130,000 payment to Daniels.

In his statement, Trout did not describe Hicks's recollections of her October 8 phone calls with Cohen or their subsequent contacts described in the newly unsealed records.

Cohen also spoke with Hicks and Keith Davidson, the lawyer for Daniels, multiple times on November 4 after Trump's circle learned the Wall Street Journal was about to publish an article saying the National Enquirer had "shielded" Trump from allegations by former Playboy model Karen McDougal that she and Trump had had an affair.

"He was clearly motivated to do something that I wasn't aware of", Hicks said. The next morning, Cohen sent a text message to Hicks saying he felt the Journal story was getting "little to no traction". "Keep praying! It's working!"

Cohen pleaded guilty a year ago to arranging hush-money payments, which he said were made at Trump's direction.