United Kingdom arrests Manchester bomber's brother

London had sought the extradition of Abedi after police issued an arrest warrant for murder attempted murder and conspiracy to cause an explosion

London had sought the extradition of Abedi after police issued an arrest warrant for murder attempted murder and conspiracy to cause an explosion

The younger brother of the Manchester Arena suicide bomber will be charged with murder after being extradited to the United Kingdom, police say.

Officers escorted Hashem Abedi on a plane from Libya on Wednesday.

Two women wrapped in thermal blankets stand near the Manchester Arena, where USA singer Ariana Grande had been performing, in Manchester, northern England, Britain, May 23, 2017.

"Today my thoughts are with the victims of the Manchester Arena attacks and I can assure them that we will not rest until justice is done".

Chief Constable of Greater Manchester Police Ian Hopkins said: "The Crown Prosecution Service successfully applied for the extradition of Hashem Abedi from Libya and today he has been extradited for offences relating to the Manchester Arena attack".

"I confirm you that Hashem [Abedi] is now in the air on his way to the United Kingdom", said Ahmed Bin Salem, a spokesman for the Tripoli-based special deterrence force, Rada.

"He was handed over by Libyan authorities to British police officers this morning".

GMP was granted a warrant for Mr Abedi's arrest in November 2017. They escorted him on the flight back and he landed in the United Kingdom a short while ago.

Britain requested his extradition in 2017 after police issued an arrest warrant against him for murder, attempted murder and conspiracy to cause an explosion.

British politicians welcomed the extradition of Abedi.

The Libyan government had previously said they expected Hashem Abedi - now reportedly aged 22 - to be extradited to the United Kingdom before the end of previous year. "It is right that Abedi will now face criminal proceedings in the United Kingdom".

Hashem was arrested shortly after the concert bombing, Reuters reported, as Libya's counter-terrorism and anti-crime force Rada suspected he may have helped plan the attack.

Ahmed Bin Salem, a spokesman for the Tripoli-based Special Deterrence Force, said they extradited Hashem Abedi from Libya following a court order.

British members of parliament found past year that the MI5 security service missed potential opportunities to prevent the bombing.

In the aftermath of the bombing, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL, also known as ISIS) said it was responsible but security services have always treated the claim with scepticism.

The two brothers grew up in Manchester with parents who had fled Libya under the late Moammar Gadhafi.