India's Kohli says fans should be 'measured' after World Cup woe

New Zealand's Mitchell Santner celebrates with team mates after taking the wicket of India's Hardik Pandya in World Cup semi-final on July 10. — Reuters

New Zealand's Mitchell Santner celebrates with team mates after taking the wicket of India's Hardik Pandya in World Cup semi-final on July 10. — Reuters

The several hundred India fans, who had opted to stay back for the second day of the rain-interrupted contest, were left aghast as Matt Henry and Trent Boult reduced their side to 5 for 3 and then 24 for 4 in the first Powerplay. "The team played well. To just go out on the basis of 45 minutes of bad cricket is saddening", Kohli told reporters.

The Indian skipper, however, said the semifinal format has its own charm as it completely negates a team's previous performances in the event.

"For a while it looked like he (Dhoni) would turn back the clock and script another great escape, but that was not to be", wrote the Indian Express under the headline "The un-finisher".

"Just because India had won all their games so far, maybe they thought they would be able to win this game easily as well", he said.

Boult and Henry shared five wickets while spinner Mitchell Santner claimed two in a tight display to snuff out India's hopes. Srikanta Maity, a cycle shop owner in Kolkata, collapsed in his shop after the 38-year-old cricketer was given run-out by the third umpire during the nail-biting semi-final game between India and New Zealand.

"We've played outstanding cricket throughout this tournament". That (retirement) is his personal decision.

"And you saw the passion with which he played and we have seen it in Test cricket a few times, he's played knocks under tremendous pressure and he's got three triple hundreds in first class cricket if I'm not wrong, so the talent has obviously always been there". The youngsters in the team still need his mentorship, " Edulji, herself a former India captain, added.

"It was a tough game and I think our boys played their hearts out".

Cricket is like a religion in India, where players can enjoy godlike status when they win but see their effigies burnt and houses pelted with stones when they lose.

Khanna said the team will work harder and come back stronger while conveying his wishes.

"But credit to the New Zealand bowlers, the way they bowled with the new ball, moving it around, it was an outstanding skill level on display and they made life very hard for our batsmen". "They don't sledge, they don't irritate the opposition, they just focus on doing the job and they have a very good sportsman's spirit".