Denver votes on whether to become first city to decriminalize ‘magic mushrooms’

Taylor Tongate of Monterey California holds flyers at an intersection in downtown Denver on Monday as he urges voters to decriminalize the use of psilocybin the psychedelic substance in

Taylor Tongate of Monterey California holds flyers at an intersection in downtown Denver on Monday as he urges voters to decriminalize the use of psilocybin the psychedelic substance in"magic mushrooms

Passage would once again put Colorado at the forefront of American drug legalization after it became one of the first two states to vote to legalize marijuana in 2012 - though not all residents approve.

Decriminalization led by a slim 51%, according to preliminary figures on Tuesday's election released by Denver's Election Division.

Denver is deciding this week whether to become the first USA city to decriminalize the psychedelic substance in "magic mushrooms". "People can really lose their jobs, their livelihoods, and their families for something that occurs naturally".

The federal government classifies psilocybin as a Schedule I drug, with no medical goal and a high potential for abuse.

The referendum on the ballot in local elections set to produce a result late in the evening would block the city from using its resources to enforce criminal penalties for the use of psilocybin, the psychoactive substance in hallucinogenic mushrooms.

Psilocybin, the naturally occurring hallucinogenic in certain mushrooms, is now designated as a Schedule I controlled substance, so the possession of "magic mushrooms" is now illegal.

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock opposes the initiative along with District Attorney Beth McCann, but there has been no organized campaign against decriminalization.

If passed, the ballot initiative would prohibit the city from imposing criminal penalties on people at least 21 years old who use the drug or have it in their possession. The ordinance, if handed, would additionally bar the metropolis from spending money on prison enforcement for those adults and establish and "psilocybin mushroom protection evaluation panel".

Organizers turned to the same strategy that marijuana activists used to decriminalize pot possession in the city in 2005.

Some researchers warn that the compound should only be used under medical supervision and can prompt paranoia and anxiety.

Matthews said psilocybin has helped him deal with depression for years. Advocates of the drug say that it is particularly beneficial in treating anxiety and depression. "We're still figuring out marijuana, and even though things are going well so far, we're still measuring the impacts on the people of Denver". That's how democracy would possibly maybe maybe accept as true with to work and if Denver needs to be that experiment, assuming the initiative passes, sizable.

A California effort to decriminalize the use, possession, growth, sale and transportation of psilocybin failed to qualify for the statewide ballot in 2018.

"Nobody should be penalized for this substance", Matthews said.