U.S. measles count rises to 764, driven by NY outbreaks

NY Doctors backs law to strike religious exemptions of measles vaccination amid national epidemic

NY Doctors backs law to strike religious exemptions of measles vaccination amid national epidemic

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More than 764 measles cases have been confirmed in 23 states of the U.S. since the beginning of this year, the U.S. Centres for Disease Control and Prevention reported on Monday.

2014 held the previous high of confirmed measles cases, with 667 through May 3; however, 2018′s total of 372 is the next highest over the past decade, according to the CDC.

Earlier this year, the New York State Department of Health warned people in New York City that an Australian tourist who visited several attractions and venues from February 16 to February 21 was confirmed to have measles, the Advance previously reported.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported an 8.5 percent increase in the number of measles cases since April 26, also confirming that the worst outbreak of the measles in the United States since 1994 has now reached 23 states. It's the most in the USA since 1994, when 963 were reported.

Soon after, the Advance reported that there was a measles exposure at Newark Airport, according to the New Jersey Department of Health.

The outbreaks in New York - in both New York City and in suburban Rockland County - first began in the fall of 2018, and have continued into this year. Of those cases, 79.7% of infected individuals were unvaccinated.

In October of 2018, an unvaccinated child, who traveled to Israel returned home in NY with the disease.

The city's health department states that "most of these cases have involved members of the Orthodox Jewish community".

The outbreaks in these areas are linked to travelers who returned from other countries, such as Israel, Ukraine and the Philippines, with measles, according to the CDC.