Vietnam woman in Kim brother murder to be freed on May 3

Following diplomatic pressure from the Vietnamese government Malaysian prosecutors dropped the murder charge against Doan Thi Huong

Following diplomatic pressure from the Vietnamese government Malaysian prosecutors dropped the murder charge against Doan Thi Huong

The Vietnamese woman who plea-bargained and got 40 months in jail instead of the death penalty over the killing of the estranged half-brother of North Korea leader Kim Jong Un, will be freed on May 3, her lawyer said Saturday.

"Whenever North Korea is ready, we hope that the South and North could sit down together and hold concrete and practical discussions on ways to achieve progress that goes beyond what was accomplished in the two summits between North Korea and the United States", Moon said in a meeting with senior aides.

South Korean and US officials have said the North Korean regime had ordered the assassination of Kim Jong Nam, who had been critical of his family's dynastic rule.

Kim previously met twice with U.S. President Donald Trump in June 2018 in Singapore and February this year in Vietnam. "I have high regard for Chairman Kim's unwavering commitment".

President Donald Trump met with South Korean President Moon Jae-in at the White House last week. Trump hailed the decision, saying a third summit with Kim "would be good". -North Korea summits, he added.

Kim said South Korea should not "pose as a meddlesome "mediator" and "facilitator" between the North and the United States. "South Korea alliance and play the role of safeguarding the peace of Northeast Asia, we need a strong military", Moon said, according to Yonhap.

Kim blamed the collapse of the second summit with Trump on what he described as Washington's unilateral demands.

But Moon did not specifically respond to Kim's criticism that South Korea was too subservient to the "anachronistic arrogance and hostile policy of the United States", and that the South's military persisted in "veiled hostility" by conducting exercises with US forces. Experts said this could be a sign of his desire to keep recent months of up-and-down nuclear diplomacy alive rather than returning to the threats and weapons tests that characterized 2017, when many feared possible war on the Korean Peninsula.