New Zealand terrorist who killed 50 'visited' Britain during 'radicalisation tour'

Australian Man Appears In Court On Murder Charge After Christchurch Attack

Australian Man Appears In Court On Murder Charge After Christchurch Attack

The terrorist who led an attack in which 50 people were gunned down in two mosques is believed to have travelled to Britain on a two-month tour of Europe which galvinised his extremism, the Telegraph can reveal.

The death toll in the New Zealand mosque shootings rose to 50 after police found another body in one of the mosques.

An overwhelmed hospital was forced to delay surgeries as it struggled to cope with the sheer number of wounded.

Another 34 victims remained at Christchurch Hospital, where officials said 12 were in critical condition.

Ostankino TV tower is seen with lights turned off in memory of the victims of New Zealand's Christchurch mosque attack, in Moscow, Russia March 16, 2019.

At least 49 people have died, seven at Linwood Masjid Mosque and 41 at Masjid Al Noor Mosque.

Condemning the terror strike, Ardern had described it as a "terror attack" and said it "appears to have been well planned".

Ms Yasmin Ali, a Christchurch resident, told New Zealand's 1 News that she lost a close family friend who she loved like a grandfather and now fears she could be targeted just for wearing her headscarf in public.

The Prime Minister said the advice she had received from police indicated that the timing of the email and the information it contained did not provide enough time for response.

Questions have been raised about why Tarrant had not appeared on a watchlist of New Zealand or Australian security agencies.

New Zealand's Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern.

Police rammed the suspect's vehicle and arrested him as he drove away from the second mosque in the suburb of Linwood.

She said the intent of the attack was to target a city and country that was well known for its safety.

Residents hug each other after paying their respects by placing flowers for the victims of the mosques attacks in Christchurch at the Masjid Umar mosque in Auckland

He said he survived by playing dead, but was desperate to know what happened to his friends who were there with him.

"We have had these guns available for a long time and we very rarely have a situation like this".

New Zealand has tried to tighten laws before but a strong gun lobby and culture of hunting has stymied efforts.

"She came here for the peace.now she is shocked", he said, adding his mother was too afraid to leave her house.

Khokhur, 58, and husband Mehaboobbhai Khokhur, 65, had traveled from India to spend time with their son Imran, their first visit in the eight years since he moved to New Zealand.

Ardern said Tarrant was a licensed gun owner who allegedly used five weapons, including two semi-automatic weapons and two shotguns, which had been modified. She said a ban on semi-automatic weapons would be considered.

Watch: PM Ardern's comments on tightening gun laws.

"There is one charge of murder brought at the moment, it is reasonable to assume that there will be others", the presiding judge noted.

He also reached out to the Muslim community in Christchurch and in New Zealand.

A fourth person was arrested yesterday in the wake of the shootings, but has been released without charge.

Pence also affirmed US cooperation in ensuring all the perpetrators were brought to justice.

"Fijian hearts are breaking for our brothers and sisters in New Zealand - a place where an atrocity of this nature is shocking nearly beyond comprehension".