Children, Foreigners Among Those Killed In Attacks On Christchurch Mosques

Brenton Tarrant appears in court

Brenton Tarrant appears in court

"While work is being done as to the chain of events that led to both the holding of this gun license and the possession of these weapons, I can tell you one thing right now: Our gun laws will change", she said at a news conference on Saturday.

Members of New Zealand's Muslim Association in Auckland travelled to Christchurch to help with Muslim funeral rites, which consists of washing the bodies, wrapping them in white cloth and moving them to the cemetery.

Bush also said that two suspects arrested at a police cordon during the attacks when a firearm was found in their vehicle were not directly involved in Tarrant's assault.

A video of one of the shootings was live streamed on Facebook by a man identifying himself as Brenton Tarrant.

After Tarrant left, the judge said that while "there is one charge of murder brought at the moment, it is reasonable to assume that there will be others".

Residents pay their respects by placing flowers for the victims of the mosques attacks in Christchurch.

"Many of you may have seen the footage of the arrests, and I can only describe it as an act of bravery on behalf of all New Zealanders, and an act that shows very little regard for their own personal safety", she said.

Khokhur and husband Mehaboobbhai Khokhur had travelled from India to spend time with Imran, who dropped off his father at the Al Noor mosque on Friday and was looking for a parking space when the shooting began.

Church services for victims of the attack were held around the country, including at Christchurch's "Cardboard Cathedral", a temporary structure built after much of the central city was destroyed in a 2011 natural disaster.

Tarrant was not known to the authorities, Bush said, and had no previous convictions.

"She came here for the peace.now she is shocked", he said, adding his mother was too afraid to leave her house.

None of those arrested had a criminal history or were on watchlists in New Zealand or Australia.

Ms Arden stated the deadly attacks was one of New Zealand's "darkest days" and vowed to change the country's current gun laws.

New Zealand law enforcement is working with Australian intelligence and police in the "wide-reaching" investigation, the commissioner said. Armed police were deployed at several locations in all cities, unusual in a country that has had low levels of gun violence.

The judge briefed the media before the hearing, saying videos and photographs were only released by approved New Zealand media outlets including TVNZ and RNZ. Neighboring Australia has virtually banned semi-automatic rifles from private ownership since a lone gunman killed 35 people with assault rifles in 1996.

US President Donald Trump, who condemned the attack as a "horrible massacre", was praised by the accused gunman in a manifesto posted online as "a symbol of renewed white identity and common purpose".

Ardern called on the USA government to show "sympathy and love for all Muslim communities", and told the press that "the person who has committed this violent act has no place here".