Space station crew confident on eve of first launch since rocket failure

Astronauts to make 2nd attempt to get to space station after launch aborted in October

Astronauts to make 2nd attempt to get to space station after launch aborted in October

USA astronauts Christina Hammock Koch, left, Nick Hague, right, and Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin, members of the main crew to the International Space Station (ISS), pose near a bus prior to the launch of the Soyuz FG rocket at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Wednesday, March 13, 2019.

A Russian Soyuz rocket carrying NASA astronauts Nick Hague and Christina Koch along with Roscosmos' Alexei Ovchinin lifted off as planned from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 12:14 a.m. Friday (1914 GMT Thursday).

For Ovchinin and Hague, it is the first flight since an emergency landing two minutes after they blasted off on October 11, 2018.

The Soyuz MS-12 took off at 1914 GMT, as planned, and is due to bring Russian cosmonaut Alexei Ovchinin and US astronauts Nick Hague and Christina Koch to the International Space Station around eight hours later.

Live footage showed the men being shaken violently by the vibrating rocket as it broke down while flying. The system detached a capsule with the crew from the rocket and sent it back down to the ground on a severe ballistic trajectory.

Mr Ovchinin, 47, told reporters before the latest launch that the rocket was now in good shape, although a small fault had been discovered during its final checks on Tuesday.

"There are no problems", he told reporters.