From 1972 killings to charges against soldier — Bloody Sunday timeline

Young Catholic rioters hurl projectiles 02 March 1972 in Londonderry at British soldiers during a rally protesting the 30 January Bloody Sunday killing by British paratroopers of 13 Catholics civil rights marchers in Londonderry

Young Catholic rioters hurl projectiles 02 March 1972 in Londonderry at British soldiers during a rally protesting the 30 January Bloody Sunday killing by British paratroopers of 13 Catholics civil rights marchers in Londonderry

The army veteran, known as Soldier F, has been charged with the murder of demonstrators James Wray and William McKinney and the attempted murders of four other men, the Director of Public Prosecutions for Northern Ireland said Thursday.

Former members of the support company of the 1st Battalion Parachute Regiment are facing possible charges from the Public Prosecution Service.

Although rioting had become routine for Derry's youth, McCann describes the impact of Bloody Sunday as a game-changer in Northern Ireland.

Families of those who died march through the Bogside in Londonderry, Northern Ireland, ahead of an announcement over the prosecution of 17 former British soldiers and two former members of the Official IRA in connection with the events of Bloody Sunday in the city in January 1972.

The Ministry of Defence has confirmed it will cover the legal costs of any soldier facing criminal charges over Bloody Sunday. Today, the Public Prosecution Service will announce whether or not the soldiers accused of murdering the civilians killed on Bloody Sunday will face prosecution.

"In respect of the other 18 suspects, including 16 former soldiers and two alleged Official IRA members, it has been concluded that the available evidence is insufficient to provide a reasonable prospect of conviction".

It cost a quarter of a billion dollars and its conclusions, announced by British Prime Minister David Cameron in 2010, brought cheers from the people of Derry, in particular the victims' families.

Solicitor Ciaran Shiels, a solicitor for a number of them, said they were "disappointed that not all of those responsible are to face trial", PA reported.

The report exonerated all of the victims of any wrongdoing and found that none of the people who were shot by British soldiers were armed. One of the injured died months later from an inoperable tumour and some consider him the 14th fatality.

The complex investigation files included 668 witness statements, numerous physical exhibits such as photographs, video and audio recordings, and a total of 125,000 pages of material.