Council supports Time to Talk Day

Time To Talk? Half Of Brits Don't Talk To Friends In Real Life Because Of Social Media

Time To Talk? Half Of Brits Don't Talk To Friends In Real Life Because Of Social Media

Nearly three quarters (70%) said group chats and social media lead to more "surface level" chats - such as sending amusing videos, banter and gossip - rather than deeper and meaningful conversations about wellbeing. 80% of respondents said they had noticed an overall increase in awareness of mental health generally in the United Kingdom, however a staggering 62% said they noticed no change in the levels of awareness in the workplace.

"Social media can be an unbelievable, connective place but a "like", or even hundreds of "likes", can't replace conversation", she said.

Christine Fortune, a psychotherapist from the Counselling Directory, told HuffPost UK we live in a fast-paced society where social media gives us instant access to hundreds of friends, but increasingly many people lack day-to-day physical human contact with real people. "Social media can be an wonderful, connective place but a "like", or even hundreds of "likes", can't replace conversation". Having these all important conversations can make a huge difference to so many people. To know that they were there not just online but also offline was so comforting and healing.

Northumbria Police are backing national Time to Talk Day which is about showing support for mental health issues. The support I received and the messages people sent meant the world.

Figures released today as part of "Time To Talk Day" show that the average person in Norwich has 909 friends on social media, yet a third of us say we wouldn't feel able to call upon any of those friends if we were struggling.

Almost 4,000 workplaces and thousands of schools and community groups will take part in Time to Talk Day.

It's become increasingly clear that mental health is an issue that affects nearly everyone in one way or another.

Celebrity supporters such as Dame Kelly Holmes, Dr Ranj Singh and Matt Johnson have taken part in kick starting a social media campaign whereby supporters are asked to share their "key ingredient" for a meaningful conversation about mental health.

Jonah Stuckart, 2018 Youth Dream Bursary Recipient, drops the puck with David Gabert and Tara DeHeer from Canadian Mental Health Association for Lethbridge Hurricanes Jordy Bellerive, right, and Regina Pats Brady Pouteau for the mental health home game, Tuesday night at the Enmax Centre.

Vanessa Sallows, benefits and governance director at Legal & General, which runs its Not A Red Card campaign to raise awareness of mental health initiatives, agreed that "more needs to be done". Enter your location in the box below to find a counsellor near you.