Cabinet splits over second referendum on Brexit deal

Media playback is unsupported on your device                  Media caption Tory MP Lee Rowley explains why he will be voting against Theresa May's withdrawal deal

Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Tory MP Lee Rowley explains why he will be voting against Theresa May's withdrawal deal

But if the Prime Minister's withdrawal deal is shot down on Tuesday Mrs Rudd believes the "Plan B" Norway model for Britain's trading relationship with the European Union could be an option.

However, before the Brexit deal can be set in stone the UK Parliament needs to approve it before the deal can come into effect.

"A lot of people have a ideal vision of what they think Brexit should look like, and that "perfect" is not available", she told BBC Radio 4's Today.

MPs needed to consider if they preferred the alternatives, including the softer Brexit Norway-style option or another referendum that risked reversing the 2016 result, said Ms Rudd.

Meanwhile, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said he would consider delaying Britain's exit from the European Union to negotiate a better deal if his party came to power.

Some cabinet ministers now believe that May is so wedded to her Brexit deal that her only method of gaining approval will be through another referendum - and that the arguments for a second vote are emerging as stronger than those for a soft Brexit.

This option would be particularly unpalatable to Brexit backers as it would see the United Kingdom remain closely tied to the EU, inside both the single market and a customs union.

'This is why I think it is important for people not just to think why they don't particularly like the Withdrawal Agreement but what they would like better that is available and would get through the House of Commons'. I think because I was a Remainer I feel it's a very hard job to deliver.

She added: "The point about me discussing other alternatives is to remind people that it is all very well saying, 'I don't like this about the agreement or I don't like that about the agreement'".

"We now need far more input and information from national Government in how they are going to work with us", he said.

Ms Rudd argued there was "a lot of support" for the Norway-plus model in the Commons and a "certain amount of support" for a people's vote.

The Cabinet minister also appeared to endorse an amendment to the Government's motion for the vote on Tuesday tabled by former Northern Ireland minister Sir Hugo Swire in an attempt to win over wavering Eurosceptics.

Ms Shah (Bradford West) said: "It's clear from the fiasco that we've seen in recent days this Government is not fit to lead the country, nor to deliver a Brexit agreement that won't leave us in a worse position than we already find ourselves in through years of Tory austerity".

The letter says the prime minister's agreement will protect the constitutional integrity of the United Kingdom and will protect jobs and investments. I am absolutely convinced.

"I believe that if the response is, "we've lost but we will do this all over again", it will become a leadership issue".

Eurosceptic Iain Duncan Smith cautioned against Mrs May and her Cabinet deciding to "brazen it out", saying such an approach would be a "disaster".

Meanwhile, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said he would consider delaying Britain's exit from the European Union to negotiate a better deal if his party came to power. "If it meant holding things a bit longer to do it, of course", he told Sky News.

Kent Council's leader Paul Carter called for emergency measures to prevent lorries entering the county to avoid chaos on the roads.