Nasa's InSight: The lander captures first sounds made by wind on Mars

InSight is designed to study the interior of Mars like never before using seismology instruments to detect quakes and a self-hammering mole to measure heat escape from the planet's crust

InSight is designed to study the interior of Mars like never before using seismology instruments to detect quakes and a self-hammering mole to measure heat escape from the planet's crust

Humans can now hear the haunting, low rumble of wind on Mars for the first time, after NASA's InSight lander captured vibrations from the breeze on the Red Planet, the USA space agency said on December 07.

The wind you hear in this recording is blowing at between 10 and 15 mph (5 to 7 meters per second) and originates from northwest of the lander, the scientists reported.

"InSight is going take the heartbeat and vital signs of the Red Planet for an entire Martian year, two Earth years". The vehicle arrived on Mars in November, successfully landing after months of travel to the Red Planet.

For the first time, humans can hear wind from Mars. An air pressure sensor and seismometer detected the vibrations on December 1.

We've seen the surface of Mars, through pictures. Well, thanks to NASA's latest mission, we have an idea.

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory released audio clips of the alien wind Friday. "The solar panels on the lander's sides respond to pressure fluctuations of the wind". "But one of the things [the InSight mission] is dedicated to is measuring motion on Mars, and naturally that includes motion caused by sound waves". An internal air pressure sensor whose job it is to collect meteorological data, recorded the air vibrations directly.

The first sounds ever recorded on Mars have been beamed back to Earth. The seismometer will be moved to the Martian surface in the coming weeks; until then, the team plans to record more wind noise. NASA's Mars Polar Lander was carrying a microphone when it crashed into Mars in 1999. For now, it is recording wind data that scientists will later be able to cancel out of data from the surface, allowing them to separate "noise" from actual Marsquakes. When InSight is conducting its science mission, the seismometer won't be able to hear the wind, attuned only to the grumblings of the planet's interior.

The first image the lander sent back right after it made its successful landing was obstructed and hard to make out because the lens cap was still on the camera but with the cap off the photos are far more clear now.