1,000 feet of spiderwebs blanket large part of Greek town

A lagoon in western Greece is covered in a 1,000-foot spider web as mating season hits the island of Aitoliko

A lagoon in western Greece is covered in a 1,000-foot spider web as mating season hits the island of Aitoliko

The video, posted on YouTube by Giannis Giannakopoulos, shows a beach in the town of Aitoliko covered in webs almost 300m long.

The web has been built by spiders of the Tetragnatha genus.

While they may be horrifying, these "long-jawed orb weavers" are completely harmless to humans.

Locals said the sudden rise in spiders had come with the arrival of mosquitoes in the town. Even more, the vast silky cover made up by spiders is not going to last long.

Molecular biologist Maria Chatzaki told Greek news website Newsit.gr: "These spiders are not unsafe for humans and will not cause any damage to the area's flora".

Speaking to Greek news websites, molecular biologist Maria Chatzaki said that the spiders are not risky to humans and she not be feared.

Maria Chatzaki, professor of molecular biology and genetics at Democritus University of Thrace, told Newsit Greece's high temperatures are creating the flawless climate for reproduction.

'They mate, they reproduce and provide a whole new generation'.

She noted that the phenomena had been seen before in the region in 2003, and that the spiders would soon die off, and the web would degrade naturally, leaving the vegetation undamaged.

Jasmine holds a Master's in Journalism from Ryerson University in Toronto and writes professionally in a broad variety of genres.