Man dies after shark attack off Cape Cod

Two people look out at the shore after a reported shark attack at Newcomb Hollow Beach in Wellfleet Mass. Saturday Sept. 15 2018

Two people look out at the shore after a reported shark attack at Newcomb Hollow Beach in Wellfleet Mass. Saturday Sept. 15 2018

The death follows an August 15 attack on 61-year-old William Lytton, who was swimming off Long Nook Beach in Truro, also on Cape Cod.

The man, identified Saturday night as Arthur Medici, was boogie boarding about 300 yards south of Newcomb Hollow Beach in Wellfleet when a shark attacked him around 12:15 p.m., according to authorities. Officials closed the beach shortly after the attack.

Hayley Williamson, a Cape Cod resident and former lifeguard who was on the beach at the time, was left in disbelief.

The Scarsdale, New York, native hopes to be released soon from the hospital and rehabilitation center he's been in since but has one more surgery scheduled.

But until today, there hadn't been a fatal shark attack in MA since 1936, which happened at Hollywood Beach in Buzzards Bay. Almost 40 years prior, in 1897, a man fishing south of Lynn was killed.

A witness of the attack told the Providence Journal he saw "a giant eruption of water - 15 feet-wide". "You could tell by the body language of the guys in the water something wasn't right".

Booth said it was a quiet day at the beach, and he saw some people boogie-boarding before he noticed some commotion in the water.

'It was like right out of that movie Jaws.

Eyewitness Joe Booth described horrifying scenes as the man was pulled from the looking like he was in "a world of hurt".

This is the second shark attack to take place in Cape Cod this summer.

"It is my personal belief that the responsibility for this frightful shark attack rests squarely upon the shoulders of the aforementioned officials for their utter lack of attention and inaction regarding the growing shark problem on Cape Cod of the last few years", he said.

Along with federal, state, and local officials, he blames the Atlantic White Shark Conservancy for not taking the issue more seriously.