Kenya's golden outing at Berlin marathon: Kipchoge smashes record, Cherono dazzles

Eliud Kipchoge crosses the start line

Eliud Kipchoge crosses the start line

Kenya's Olympic champion Eliud Kipchoge pulverised the marathon world record with a blistering run on Sunday, slicing a staggering 78 seconds off the previous best to land the one major running crown that had eluded him.

The 33-year old who came eight seconds close to breaking the 2:02:57 mark at the London Marathon in 2016 ran a race against the clock nearly the entire race becoming the first man ever to run the marathon under two hours and two minutes, as he achieved a target he had longed for.

A few minutes later Gladys Cherono won the women's race in Berlin in a course record of 2:18:11, making her the fourth fastest woman in history behind Paula Radcliffe, Mary Keitany and Tirunesh Dibaba. But he had done most of his talking already, on the streets of the German capital, setting off with just three pacemakers for company, and going through halfway in 61 minutes and six seconds before - incredibly - speeding up to run the second half in 60:33.

"I always say Berlin forever". It was really hard, but I was truly prepared to run my own race. "I will come back next year", he said. "Running a sub two hours two minutes was simply incredible and I believe I can still go below that with such good conditions". The celebration continued with Kipchoge taking pictures and embracing fans while the next runner would cross the finish line four minutes and 44 seconds later.

He started off with a sizzling pace and quickly shook off his biggest opponent, Wilson Kipsang, to make it a one-man race.

All the world records came from the Berlin course.

He added: "I ran my own race, I trusted my trainers, my programme and my coach - that's what pushed me in the last kilometres". But what more it more impressive still was the fact that Kipchoge had to run the last 17 kilometres (10.5 miles) alone after his pacemakers dropped out early.

Kipchoge kept up the pace to sprint through the Brandenburg Gate and complete a world record race that cements his reputation as one of the greatest runners of all time.

In the men's race, second place went to is Amos Kipruto (KENYA) with 2:06:23 and third is Wilson Kipsang (KENYA) with 2:06:48. Kipruto and Kipsang's times are an indication of how Kipchoge's pace blew the race apart from the outset. You are our heroes. "Proud of you brother #Magicalkenya", Wanyama tweeted.