Hurricane Florence brings flooding and blackouts

HURRICANE FLORENCE

HURRICANE FLORENCE

Ominously, forecasters said the onslaught on the North Carolina-South Carolina coast would last for hours and hours because the hurricane had come nearly to a dead stop at just 3 mph (6 kph) as of midday. And others could only hope someone would come for them. "This one is set to linger right where it is for at least 48 hours". "Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 80 miles (130 km) from the centre and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 195 miles (315 km)".

A view of Hurricane Florence is shown churning in the Atlantic Ocean in a west, north-westerly direction heading for the eastern coastline of the United States.

The wind howled and sheets of rain splattered against windows of a hotel before dawn in Wilmington, where Sandie Orsa of Wilmington sat in a lobby lit by emergency lights after the power failed.

Spanish moss waved in the trees as the winds picked up in Wilmington, and floating docks bounced atop swells at Morehead City.

Jamie Thompson walks through flooded sections of East Front Street near Union Point Park in New Bern, N.C. Forecasters said conditions will deteriorate throughout Friday.

"Trees are blowing down in the wind". "This rainfall would produce catastrophic flash flooding and prolonged significant river flooding", the Hurricane Center said.

The Wilmington airport had a wind gust clocked at 169 km/hr the highest since Hurricane Helene in 1958.

The powerful Category 1 storm is making its way south along the Carolina coast hours after making technical landfall early Friday morning.

In Jacksonville, North Carolina, next to Camp Lejeune, firefighters and police fought wind and rain as they went door-to-door to pull people out of the Triangle Motor Inn after the structure began to crumble and the roof started to collapse. Another 400 people were in shelters in Virginia, where forecasts were less dire.

About 10 million people could be affected by the storm and more than 1 million were ordered to evacuate the coasts of the Carolinas and Virginia.

Coastal towns in the Carolinas were largely empty, and schools and businesses closed as far south as Georgia.

FOX Business took a look at the impact the Category 1 storm has already had on some of these businesses operating in the Carolinas.

Right now, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Hurricane Center is predicting that Florence will become a tropical storm tomorrow (Sept. 15) over SC, continue northwest to eastern Kentucky, then swing northeast and track over most of New England early next week.

Given the storm's size and slow speed, officials warned that Florence could cause similar large-scale flood damage to that seen in the Houston area during Hurricane Harvey just over a year ago.