U.S. identifies remains of two servicemen killed in the Korean War

A soldier carries a casket containing the remains of a US soldier killed during the 1950-53 Korean War after arriving from North Korea at Osan Air Base in Pyeongtaek

A soldier carries a casket containing the remains of a US soldier killed during the 1950-53 Korean War after arriving from North Korea at Osan Air Base in Pyeongtaek

Two more USA service members have been identified from the 55 boxes of war remains that North Korea returned in July, officials said Monday.

The U.S. service members were killed decades ago while fighting in the Korean War.

The Pentagon said USA and North Korean military officials held negotiations last week on surrendering more remains.

Forensic anthropologists are combing through the remains at a secure facility on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. Vice President Pence spoke at the repatriation ceremony, where he praised the event as "tangible progress" in negotiations between the USA and North Korea. They have thus far analyzed DNA from about half of the boxes, with some remains in better condition than others.

The identities of the two sets of remains were confirmed through a DNA sample, chest X-rays and dental records, Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency Chief Scientist John Byrd told the Military Times.

According to estimates from the Department of Defense, there are approximately 7,700 USA troops who remain missing from the Korean War.

"We noticed. within a few seconds of opening up the box, and pulling him out, that we think this individual is African American and tall and slender", Byrd said.

She spoke above tables of bone fragments, still separated with numbers corresponding with the 55 boxes.

But the next round of identifications might take longer and might be completed "right after Christmas", Byrd added.

Jin, a South Korean-born American citizen, said the work has a personal connection.

A United Nations Command delegation led by US Air Force Major General Michael Minihan met with North Korean officials at Panmunjom Friday to discuss "military-to-military efforts to support any potential future return of remains", AFP reported Tuesday.

The Pentagon has said it is considering the possibility of sending personnel to North Korea to search for more remains.