Worcester has one of the lowest rates for organ donors

NHS Blood and Transplant says more people need to sign up to the organ donor register because the people already on the list are growing older meaning their lungs are less likely to be able to be used

NHS Blood and Transplant says more people need to sign up to the organ donor register because the people already on the list are growing older meaning their lungs are less likely to be able to be used

NHS Blood and Transplant is now urging more people in West Sussex to tell their families that they want to save lives through organ donation.

Only 27% of the people who joined the United Kingdom register a year ago were over 50, but 72% of people whose organs could potentially be used after their deaths are aged 50 or over.

The figures have been released by NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) to mark Organ Donation Week (September 4-9).

It said the ageing population, and improvements in trauma care and public safety, are likely to be contributing to the rise in the lung transplant waiting list, by changing the profile of donors.

As Darren Adam marked the NHS' Organ Donation Week, Erica called the LBC presenter to explain just how she goes about telling her kids that she wants her organs passed on to others after she passes away.

Although more people are supporting donation than ever, one in three families still decline to donate. Councils and organisations around the country are lighting prominent buildings pink, which is the colour of the modern donor card, in support of the country's organ donation campaign.

Research undertaken by the organisation shows people from ethnic minorities are less likely to talk about donation, while some religious people may have concerns surrounding burial practices.

NHS Blood and Transplant - which provides the blood donation service for England and the organ donation service for the United Kingdom - is running the "Yes I Donate" organ donation campaign, to inspire people to tell their families that they want to donate.

"Sadly, many donation opportunities are lost every year because families don't know if their loved one wanted to be a donor or not".

People are being asked to discuss their end-of-life wishes with loved ones who have the final say over what happens to their organs.

"Telling your family what you want also makes things easier at a hard time".

A mother-of-two whose life was saved by two transplants is calling on Banbury Guardian readers to talk about organ donation and consider joining the register.