Prehistoric giant shark teeth found on Australian beach

Amateur fossil hunter stumbles upon rare teeth from ancient mega-shark

Amateur fossil hunter stumbles upon rare teeth from ancient mega-shark

"These teeth are of worldwide significance, as they represent one of just three associated groupings of Carcharocles angustidens teeth in the world, and the very first set ever to be discovered in Australia", stated Dr. Erich Fitzgerald, a Senior Curator of Vertebrate Palaeontology.

Colloquially known as the great jagged narrow-toothed shark, this predatory mammoth prowled the ancient seas 25 million years ago, during the Oligocene epoch, preying on penguins and small whales.

Amateur fossil finder and Australian teacher Philip Mullaly made the discovery during a beach walk at Jan Juc, a fossil site on the Victoria coast about an hour south of Melbourne. "These teeth are of global significance, as they represent one of just three associated groupings of Carcharocles angustidens teeth in the world, and the very first set to ever be discovered in Australia".

So he led a team of palaeontologists, volunteers, and Mullaly on two expeditions earlier this year to excavate the site, collecting more than 40 teeth in total.

The New York Times reports Mullaly found the teeth in 2015.

The teeth fossils are now on exhibit at Museums Victoria.

"These smaller teeth came from several different individuals and would have become dislodged from their jaws as they fed on the huge carcass of Carcharocles angustidens", said Museums Victoria paleontologist Tim Ziegler. First of all, this is the first time that fossilized teeth belonging to this mega-shark species have turned up in Australia.

Among the treasure trove of megashark teeth, the team also found prehistoric teeth belonging to a sixgill shark, which is a bottom-feeding scavenger that still swims off the coasts of Australia today.

A prehistoric shark feast the Carcharocles angustidens being feasted upon by several Six Gill Sharks.

This makes the newfound fossils all the more extraordinary, as multiple shark teeth coming from the same specimen are notoriously hard to find.

Inches teeth belong to the extinct predator known as Osasuna big toothed shark. She could grow by more than nine metres in length. "They are still sharp, even 25 million years later".

Fitzgerald suspected they came from one individual shark and there might be more entombed in the rock.