Charlottesville marks anniversary of violent clash with Rally for Justice (VIDEOS, PHOTOS)

Police officers march past a statue of Confederate leader Robert E. Lee in Market Street Park as they set up a perimeter to prevent a repeat of last year's Unite the Right rally in downtown Charlottesville Virginia USA 10 August 2018

Police officers march past a statue of Confederate leader Robert E. Lee in Market Street Park as they set up a perimeter to prevent a repeat of last year's Unite the Right rally in downtown Charlottesville Virginia USA 10 August 2018

FILE - A vehicle plows into a group of counter-protesters marching in Charlottesville, Virginia, on the day of the "Unite the Right" rally, August 12, 2017, killing one person and injuring scores of others.

Jason Kessler, 34, organizer of both the Charlottesville rally and Sunday's demonstration, calls himself a "white civil rights" activist and said his goal is to spark a conversation while keeping everyone safe.

In addition to Ms. Trump's condemnation, President Donald Trump also tweeted out on the anniversary of Charlottesville, writing: "The riots in Charlottesville a year ago resulted in senseless death and division". 'I condemn all types of racism and acts of violence.

The comments demonstrate a marked change...

"I just would like people to focus on the anniversary, not on Heather, but on the issues that she died for - Black Lives Matter, overpolicing, affordable housing, for more truth and the telling of the history of Charlottesville - and to focus on where they need to go as a community", Bro said.

Hundreds of students and protesters descended on Charlottesville's downtown mall and the University of Virginia on Saturday. The Governor has declared a state of emergency in Charlottesville.

The violence culminated with a man driving a vehicle into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing a woman and injuring 19 people.

Kyle Rodland, who took his young sons to get ice cream downtown, said he felt much safer than previous year, when he left town with his family and stayed with his parents after seeing people armed with long rifles walking around outside his home.

Trump's words contrast sharply with his first public comments on the events last summer, which left 32-year-old anti-racist counterprotester Heather Heyer dead after a suspected white nationalist plowed his auto into a crowd on August 12, 2017.

Several white nationalist leaders have disavowed Sunday's rally and asked their followers not to attend. "It's another thing when we look at the direction that you're going and see that the very things that you say that you stand for, you undermine through your actions".

Last year, 22-year-old Clara Carlson faced down the group of white supremacists who marched through campus, surrounding her and a group of friends.

Chants included "no justice, no peace", "take the statues down", and anti-police messages such as "last year they came with torches, this year, they came with badges".

Authorities said two people were arrested, one for trespassing and the other for disorderly conduct. "You know, I'm happy that things didn't get out of hand", said John Mason, an associate professor of history at UVA. An extensive review identified "gaps" in planning and communication among agencies, culminating in this year's plan, Charlottesville Police Chief RaShall Brackney said.

An independent investigation of last year's rally violence, led by a former federal prosecutor, found the chaos stemmed from a passive response by law enforcement and poor preparation and coordination between state and city police.

The tweets posted on Saturday night come on the anniversary of deadly unrest triggered by a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.