Investigation into 1955 murder of black United States teenager Emmett Till reopened

Till a 14-year-old black Chicago boy who was kidnapped tortured and murdered in 1955 after he allegedly whistled at a white woman in Mississippi. The federal government has reopened its investigation into

Till a 14-year-old black Chicago boy who was kidnapped tortured and murdered in 1955 after he allegedly whistled at a white woman in Mississippi. The federal government has reopened its investigation into

But now, the Associated Press reports, the Justice Department has reopened its investigation, citing "new information" in the notorious murder case that galvanized the Civil Rights Movement.

In this September 23, 1955, file photo, J.W. Milam, left, his wife, second left, Roy Bryant, far right, and his wife, Carolyn Bryant, sit together in a courtroom in Sumner, Miss.

In closing arguments, the defense team appealed to jurors' heritage, saying their ancestors would turn in their graves if they didn't free these fine, white men.

"It's probably always an open case until all the parties have passed away", Richardson said, noting that if any relevant cases were to move forward, he and the district attorney of the area in which Emmett's body was found would decide who would prosecute it. Both are now dead. "Goddam you, I'm going to make an example of you - just so everybody can know how me and my folks stand.'" Both men are dead now.

Bryant, whose name is now Carolyn Donham, is in her 80s and lives in North Carolina.

According to the Associated Press, the federal government has reopened the investigation into Till's murder. Only one resulted in in a federal conviction since the act became law, that of Ku Klux Klansman James Ford Seale for kidnapping two black teenagers, Charles Moore and Henry Dee, who were killed in MS in 1964. Relatives of Till pushed Attorney General Jeff Sessions to reopen the case past year after publication of the book.

"None of us wants to do anything that jeopardizes any investigation or impedes, but we are also very interested in justice being done", she told the outlet, declining to discuss specifics. After they finished reportedly assaulting him, the two shot Emmett in the head and threw the teen's body - which had been tied to the cotton gin fan with barbed wire - into the river.

Emmett's mother, Mamie Till-Mobley, was horrified to see the state of her son's body when it was returned to her.

Images of his mutilated body gave witness to the depth of racial hatred in the Deep South and inspired civil rights campaigns.

In her testimony at the murder trial, Bryant said that a "nigger man" grabbed her by the hand in her store and said to her, "How about a date, baby?"

"He said, 'How about a date, baby?'" she testified, according to a trial transcript released by the Federal Bureau of Investigation a decade ago.

Last year, Vanity Fair published an article in which author and Duke University scholar Timothy Tyson said Carolyn Bryant - by then, Carolyn Bryant Donham - confessed she made up the most damning part of her story. The book says the woman acknowledged she wasn't truthful when she testified that the 14-year-old Till grabbed her.