Elon Musk Sends Mini Submarine to Rescue Boys Trapped in Thai Cave

Richard William Stanton Robert Charles Harper and John Volanthen

Richard William Stanton Robert Charles Harper and John Volanthen

Typically people would learn to scuba dive before embarking on a more technically challenging cave dive like the one involved in the rescue effort, said Chris Foisey, a St. Catharines, Ont. -based scuba instructor with experience diving through underwater tunnels.

The plight of the boys and their coach has drawn global attention since they became trapped when they went into the cave after soccer practice on June 23.

The saga has dominated global headlines, with the team spending nine days unaccounted for inside the cave, before British divers found them - emaciated and dishevelled - huddling on a muddy bank above the flooding.

After pondering for days how to get the 13 out, a rescue operation was launched on Sunday when four of the boys were brought out, tethered to rescue divers.

Thai Navy SEALS on Monday proudly announced their latest successful extraction of four youth soccer players trapped in a cave by adopting the U.S. Navy's "Hooyah!"

The Facebook page of the Thai Navy Seals, who have been central to the rescue operation, was updated on Monday night to say "two days, eight boars" - a reference to the Wild Boars, the name of the boys' football team. "But we will have a psychiatrist to evaluate them".

Officials said the first mission lasted about 11 hours, while the second mission was two hours faster.

Rescuers working at a cave site in northern Thailand have suspended operations for the day after bringing four more boys out of the flooded cave system on Monday.

Eight boys have so far been rescued from the cave, four on Sunday and another four on Monday.

Divers are forced out of the cave by rushing floodwaters as they try to reach an air pocket called "Pattaya Beach", where the boys are believed to have retreated.

Classmates of the trapped boys at Mae Sai Prasitsart school, close to the caves, pray after their teacher announced that more of the footballers had been rescued. Some of the parents told Reuters they had not been told who had been rescued and that they were not allowed to visit the hospital.

Narongsak said, "We expect that if there is no unusual condition. the 4 boys, 1 coach, the doctor, and 3 SEALs who have been with the boys since first day will come out today".

Indeed, news of the boys' plight reached all corners of the globe, with Federation Internationale de Football Association chief Gianni Infantino having pledged to invite the Wild Boar Academy to the World Cup final if they are deemed well enough to make the trip.

Narongsak said after the first four boys were rescued that they would be quarantined "for a while because we are concerned about infections".

That led an upbeat Narongsak to promise more "good news" on Monday afternoon that materialised a few hours later with the emergence of the other four. Doctors, though, said they'll have to remain in the hospital for treatment for at least a week, insisting they can watch the big game on TV.