White House taps team for Supreme Court pick

White House taps team for Supreme Court pick

White House taps team for Supreme Court pick

Collins spoke on ABC and CNN.

All four names Leo mentioned are on Trump's list of potential Supreme Court justices.

Nelson "probably perceives that no one on that list of 25 is someone he is prepared to vote for and so it shouldn't be surprising", said Carl Tobias, a professor at the University of Richmond College of Law, who specializes in federal judicial selection.

Getting a successor to Justice Anthony Kennedy, who announced his resignation last week, approved by the Senate before the current session ends this year is a crucial task for Trump. "Susan Collins can not simultaneously say she supports Roe v. Wade and support anybody on that list; that would be quite hypocritical".

Trump has explicitly vowed in the past to appoint justices who would overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark case that affirmed abortion as a constitutional right, and his nominee following Kennedy's retirement will determine the majority of the high court for decades to come. "I think we'll have a lot of support".

"I'm pro-life but I know how that divides our country immediately and divides everyone, they're split right down the middle on that", Manchin told a West Virginia radio station.

Immediately, the Judicial Crisis Network, which pushed heavily for Trump's first Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch, released a 30-second video advertisement as part of a seven-figure campaign to confirm "another great justice", despite not even knowing who the next nominee would be. Trump said a year ago he'd asked for input from the Federalist Society and Heritage Foundation on potential Supreme Court justices; Casey called them "hard-right organizations". Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) to oppose any candidate that would threaten to overturn Roe V. Wade.

Trump spent the weekend at his New Jersey golf club conferring with his advisers, including White House counsel Don McGahn, as he considers his options to fill the vacancy that might make precedent-shattering court decisions on abortion, health care, gay marriage and other issues.

Adding to the worries of those who support abortion access, Collins's spokesman has previously said that the senator "does not apply ideological litmus tests to nominees" when asked whether she would take a nominee's stance on Roe v. Wade into account.

Collins said she and fellow Republican Sen.

"So I'm actually quite happy about it", he said.

49 percent of Independents would support the Democratic candidate, compared to 35 percent who would vote Republican.

In April 2017, Collins joined her Republican colleagues in a party-line 52-48 vote to change Senate rules so that Supreme Court nominees need only a simple majority rather than a supermajority of 60 votes to be confirmed, a move that gives minority Democrats little hope to prevent a vote.

Collins and even several Democrats agreed to back Gorsuch because they said he clearly valued legal precedent and the independence of USA courts.