PM May faces another day of Brexit compromise in parliament

Brexit news: Jeremy Corbyn faces revolt as five Labour MPs resign | Daily Star

Brexit news: Jeremy Corbyn faces revolt as five Labour MPs resign | Daily Star

May's fragile government will be trying to defeat a rebellion by pro-EU lawmakers and reverse changes to its key piece of Brexit legislation as the matter comes before the House of Commons for two days of debate.

The European Union Withdrawal Bill, meant to enact Britain's exit from the bloc, has had a rocky ride through Parliament.

That came after the embarrassing spectacle of government minister Robert Buckland effectively negotiating with Grieve, through a series of interventions in the rebel backbencher's speech, in what Anna Soubry called "a peculiar sort of horse-trading" - and then literally negotiating with him, in whispered exchanges, as the debate went on around them. He said giving Parliament power to direct the government's hand in talks would be "an unconstitutional shift which risks undermining our negotiations with the European Union".

A Department for Exiting the European Union spokesman said: "The Brexit Secretary has set out three tests that any new amendment has to meet - not undermining the negotiations, not changing the constitutional role of Parliament and Government in negotiating worldwide treaties, and respecting the referendum result". However, with the vast majority of both Leave and Remain voters agreeing that the government's negotiating strategy has been a failure, MPs across the aisle have started to have doubts about whether a satisfactory deal will be possible.

"The Labour Party respects the outcome of the European Union referendum and does not support the EEA or Norway model as it is not the right for option for Britain".

The Commons is now debating whether to accept any of the 15 changes made by the Lords against the government's wishes.

Also on Tuesday, the government successfully overturned an attempt to remove the date of Brexit from the face of the bill.

A third part of Grieve's amendment, which the government has not agreed to discuss and is likely to resist, would hand control of the Brexit negotiations to parliament if an exit deal has not been agreed by February 15 next year.

Earlier, May appeared to have also stemmed a rebellion on Wednesday over her commitment to leaving the EU's customs union which will transform Britain's trading relationships for decades to come.

A victory for the "meaningful final vote" amendment would leave the government weaker in am upcoming round of talks with European Union negotiators in late June, and also weaken Theresa May's authority as leader.

Maybe it was the moment when the former education secretary, Justine Greening, intervened on her former ministerial colleague, Dominic Grieve, that the government realised the game was up.

Parliamentary debates about complex legal amendments rarely rouse much heat, but passions run high over anything to do with Brexit.

The Daily Express, another pro-Brexit tabloid, issued a thinly-veiled threat to lawmakers, saying they should "Ignore the will of the people at [their] peril".

Parliament will vote Tuesday on a key piece of legislation, the E.U. Withdrawal bill, that would transfer European Union laws now on British books into British law after Brexit.

Ukip leader Gerard Batten said: "The only "meaningful vote" was the verdict of the people in referendum of June 23 2016".

It also imperils the now invisible border between the U.K.'s Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, an European Union member.