Maybe a Dennis Rodman sighting at Trump-Kim Singapore talks?


Maybe a Dennis Rodman sighting at Trump-Kim Singapore talks?

Chuck Schumer Is The Exact Opposite of What Democrats Need

Chuck Schumer Is The Exact Opposite of What Democrats Need

Heading into his North Korea summit with characteristic bravado, President Donald Trump says that "attitude" is more important than preparation as he looks to negotiate an accord with Kim Jong Un to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula.

That's why Trump and others should not see denuclearization as a "binary, yes-or-no" proposition, said Abigail Grace, research associate with the Asia-Pacific Security Program at the Center for New American Security.

"We could absolutely sign an agreement and we're looking at it", said Trump.

"The United States and North Korea have been holding direct talks in preparation for a summit, and North Korea has confirmed to us its willingness to denuclearise", he told reporters at a White House news conference. "Sounds a little bit odd, but that's probably the easy part". "The hard part remains after that".

Since the first inkling that a Trump-Kim summit could be on the cards, Japan has repeatedly insisted that Washington be mindful not to let its guard down with the nuclear-armed regime in Pyongyang.

The main issue for the June 12 summit in Singapore is the USA demand for North Korea to abandon a nuclear weapons program that now threatens the United States.

US allies in the region have expressed concern that Trump's push to denuclearize Korea could ignore the North's sophisticated ballistic missile and chemical weapons programs.

The Bush administration later authorized the "Six-Party Talks" that included China, Japan, Russia, and South Korea, as well as the United States and North Korea. National Security Council spokesman Garrett Marquis noted the president met with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and National Security Adviser John Bolton Thursday afternoon "to continue their strategic discussions" ahead of the summit.

Pompeo said Trump will reject anything short of "complete, verifiable and irreversible denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula".

Chuck Schumer Is The Exact Opposite of What Democrats Need

Pompeo said he was confident the president would be fully prepared and dismissed reports of division inside Trump's foreign policy team over the decision to embrace the meeting with Kim.

Pompeo, however, added that the USA would work to guarantee North Korea's security should it denuclearize. North Korea refers to itself as the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK). Abe wants assurances that Trump will address that threat in his talks with Kim, and not simply worry about longer-range missiles that have the capacity to strike the U.S. And he said he would be prepared to "walk away" altogether if the talks prove to be unfruitful, reminding reporters "I did it once before".

The prospects of a limited agreement create other challenges, analysts said, including the concern that Trump will settle for a bad deal that leaves too much of North Korea's nuclear programs intact.

"Certainly if it goes well". He said "I think it's going to be a very fruitful meeting, I think it's going to be an exciting meeting".

Pompeo said Trump's approach is "fundamentally different" from prior administrations. "That he understands that the current model doesn't work, that he's prepared to denuclearize and that two, he understands that we can't do it the way we've done it before".

But in their joint appearance, the mercurial U.S. president also displayed his instinct to make the sensitive, technical diplomatic effort into a dramatic world-stopping event.

North Korea has argued for a "phased" approach to denuclearization of the entire Korean peninsula, which in the past has also meant removal of the US nuclear umbrella protecting Washington's allies South Korea and Japan.

Abe, for his part, pushed Trump to raise with Kim the issue of Japanese abductees held in North Korea.

Trump has been, and continues to be, committed to ridding the USA and the world of threats posed by North Korea's weapons of mass destruction and ballistic missile programmes, he said.