British PM avoids Brexit defeat in knife-edge parliament vote


British PM avoids Brexit defeat in knife-edge parliament vote

Brexit news- jonathan isaby and dominic grieve

Brexit news- jonathan isaby and dominic grieve

But May won a key vote in parliament on Tuesday with a compromise on plans to give lawmakers a "meaningful" vote later this year on the terms of Britain's exit from the EU.

The move would have given Parliament the power to prevent a "no-deal" Brexit.

Conservative former minister Anna Soubry said the abuse of MPs who speak out against the government's Brexit policy "simply has to stop".

The government was putting a combative spin on the concessions Tuesday evening: "The Brexit Secretary has set out three tests that any new amendment has to meet - not undermining the negotiations, not changing the constitutional role of Parliament and Government in negotiating worldwide treaties, and respecting the referendum result", a spokesperson for the Brexit department said in a statement.

In a highly charged atmosphere in parliament, lawmakers who oppose the government said they had received death threats and brandished a copy of one of Britain's tabloid newspapers, the Daily Express, which ran a headline saying: "Ignore the will of the people at your peril". The U.K. will leave the European Union in March next year, but talks in Brussels are struggling to make headway.

MPs will spend a total of 12 hours debating and voting on 14 Lords amendments to the EU Withdrawal Bill - six hours on Tuesday and six hours on Wednesday. How does parliament have a say in those circumstances?

Members of Parliament decided by 324 votes to 298 - a majority of 26 - to reject a House of Lords amendment to the EU Withdrawal Bill.

Passions ran high in Tuesday's three-hour debate, when angry eurosceptics accused their rivals of trying to undermine the 2016 referendum vote to leave the EU. She tore into the deep division and animosity which she warned is tearing her party, and the country, apart.

It also attacked the unelected nature of the House of Lords (which traditionally scrutinizes laws passed to it by the elected lower chamber), linking it to a perceived attempt to frustrate the Brexit process.

Grieve told MPs: "If we don't achieve a deal at all, the fact is we are going to be facing an huge crisis".

"I trust the prime minister".

"Anything that undermines the government at home will make negotiations with the European Union more hard", May told a meeting of her cabinet.

Solicitor General Robert Buckland said the government would remain open-minded, but the meeting may not result in new proposals in the coming days.

"It has got to be done in good faith, because without that, we will face a situation where in fact, firstly, the other place will put it back in and secondly the goodwill will be gone when it comes back to this house", leading rebel Dominic Grieve told lawmakers. May's been resisting the demand because she doesn't want her hands to be tied during the talks.

Conservative lawmaker Phillip Lee, who had voted to remain in the European Union, resigned as the justice minister so he could speak out against the policy on Brexit.

Bill revokes the 1972 Act which took the United Kingdom into the European Economic Area, but also transposes all relevant EU law into British statute so there are no holes in the law book at the point of Brexit.

Liberal Democrat Brexit spokesman Tom Brake said: "As has become a tradition in Brexit negotiations, the Tories have been forced to cobble together a compromise".