Salmonella Outbreak Hits Several States; Pre-Cut Melon The Culprit


Salmonella Outbreak Hits Several States; Pre-Cut Melon The Culprit

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH Multi State Salmonella Outbreak Linked To Pre-cut Melons     by Press release submission |  Jun 12 2018

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH Multi State Salmonella Outbreak Linked To Pre-cut Melons by Press release submission | Jun 12 2018

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention traced the outbreak to a Caito Foods facility in Indiana. On Thursday, Walmart and Kroger removed pre-cut melon linked to this outbreak from all the stores in the affected states, the CDC reported.

Caito Foods on Friday voluntarily recalled fresh-cut watermelon, honeydew melon, cantaloupe and fresh-cut mixed fruit containing one of these melons that the supplier processed.

The recalled products were distributed to Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina, and OH and sold in clear, plastic containers at stores including Costco Wholesale Corp, Kroger Co, Payless, Owen's, Sprouts, Trader Joe's, Walgreens, Walmart Inc, and Whole Foods, a unit of Amazon.com Inc.

-Stores selling the pre-cut melon (with brand name if applicable): Walmart (Freshness Guaranteed); Whole Foods/Amazon (Whole Foods Market); Costco (Garden Highway); Kroger (generic label distributed by Renaissance Food Group); Walgreens (Delish); Trader Joe's (Trader Joe's); Jay C; Payless; Owen's; and Sprouts (Sprouts Farmers Market).

The FDA reports the youngest infected is an infant and the oldest is 97 years old. No deaths have been reported and the agencies urged residents in the eight states to throw out any melon that may have been recalled.

If you have purchased any fruit that may have been connected with the recall, the CDC is asking that you throw it away immediately.

If the UPC code is still on the product, consumers can check the number on the U.S. Food & Drug Administration website. These symptoms include a fever, diarrhea and stomach cramps. Although the shelf life of the melon is limited, Kroger said, it issued the alert out of an abundance of caution.

The illness usually lasts four to seven days and most people recover without treatment, according to the CDC.