Gap Apologizes for Selling T-shirt with 'Incorrect' Map of China


Gap Apologizes for Selling T-shirt with 'Incorrect' Map of China

Gap 'terribly sorry' over T-shirt China map without Taiwan

Gap 'terribly sorry' over T-shirt China map without Taiwan

In the statement sent to the Global Times, Gap said the T-shirt has been pulled off shelves in the Chinese market and destroyed. In the South China Sea, China is engaged in a number of disputes over islands, coral reefs, and lagoons in what is a major commercial thoroughfare that is potentially rich in resources.

USA retail giant, Gap has issued an apology after selling a T-shirt displaying the wrong map of China after the design omitted Chinese-claimed territories including islands in the South China Sea, Taiwan and south Tibet.

An apology was issued by Marriott saying that it respected and supported the sovereignty as well as territorial integrity of China.

The Gap shirt, which was sold in overseas markets, features a map of China, but Taiwan does not appear to the southeast of the country, according to a photo of the company's online store posted on the Twitter account of the official People's Daily newspaper.

"We sincerely apologize for this unintentional error", it said, adding that an internal inspection is being conducted to correct the mistake".

"If they treat the Taiwan people so unfriendly I think most of the people from Taiwan will choose other carriers instead of Air Canada", said Charles Chang, president of the Taiwan Chamber of Commerce in BC.

The move followed after a netizen had posted pictures of the shirt on Chinese social media platform Weibo, which saw Chinese territories such as south Tibet, Taiwan and the South China Sea being omitted from the map.

Fashion brand Zara and Delta Air Lines drew Beijing's ire and apologized for listing Taiwan and/or Tibet as countries on drop-down menus on their websites.

The clothing brand, based in the US, is the most recent worldwide business to be in trouble with the government of China over that country's territorial issues. Beijing considers the self-ruled, democratic island a wayward province. Following a letter to several US airlines demanding they change the way they refer to Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macau in promotional materials, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders issued a statement calling the demand "Orwellian nonsense".