Rep. Mia Love demands Trump apologize for vulgar remark about Haiti

Trump acknowledges 'tough' language but appears to deny 'shithole' remark

Trump acknowledges 'tough' language but appears to deny 'shithole' remark

Facing strong condemnation at home and overseas, U.S. president Donald Trump on Friday denied using the word "sh**hole" to describe Haiti and African countries, but kept up criticism of a Senate immigration plan that he said would force the United States to admit people from countries that "are doing badly". Trump allegedly questioned why the USA doesn't admit more immigrants from countries like Norway, whose prime minister visited the White House this week. "He should act accordingly and conduct himself in a more diplomatic manner", said Haitian immigrant Nicolle Saitlious.

According to the Charleston Post and Courier, South Carolina's other GOP senator, Tim Scott, said Graham had told him the reports were "basically accurate".

It is instructive that the White House did not deny the initial news reports.

"Mr. President, are you a racist?" she asked.

The Government of Botswana is wondering why President Trump, must use this descriptor and derogatory word, when talking about countries with whom the USA has had cordial and mutually beneficial bilateral relations for so many years.

Tweeted Republican Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona: "The words used by the president, as related to me directly following the meeting by those in attendance, were not 'tough, ' they were abhorrent and repulsive".

And despite the president's opposition, Durbin said lawmakers still plan to vote on a plan reforming DACA next week.

"The reported language used (Thursday) is unbecoming of the President, the leader of the free world", the Channahon Republican said in a statement from his Twitter account.

His promise is now in question after the comments allegedly made during a private immigration meeting with lawmakers.

"If that's not racism, I don't know how you can define it", U.S. Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, R-Fla., said.

The NAACP president predicted Trump's remarks will help motivate African-American voters in the 2018 midterm elections, saying the comments are "the language of the '50s and '60s, it is the language of a Ross Barnett and a George Wallace".

"There is a serious need for dialogue between the US Administration and the African countries".

"I think that will matter to the president", Graham told reporters after the meeting Thursday.

"I suspect the Democrats are sitting there going, 'Why would we want to compromise with him on anything", said Simpson, a senior member of the House Appropriations Committee. And she called on Trump to apologize to the American people.

Ex-president John Mahama has branded US President Donald Trump as a racist after he reportedly used crude language to describe African nations, Haiti and El Salvador. "Haiti has long history with the United States, dating back to the American Revolutionary War, (during which) 500 heroic Haitians volunteered to fight alongside the American troops for America's independence".

On Friday, Mr Trump ignored press questions about the issue as he signed a proclamation declaring a holiday in honour of civil rights hero Martin Luther King Jr - as presidents do every year. "A lot of us already knew that", the news host said on air.