Norwegians decline President Donald Trump's offer to move to US

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Senate Republican Leader Len Fasano, who has come under fire for not forcefully criticizing Donald Trump in the past, strongly denounced the Republican President on Friday for describing Haiti and other nations as "shithole countries".

Trump reportedly referred to a series of nations as "shithole countries" during a closed-door Oval Office meeting with lawmakers Thursday about a deal on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, questioning why the United States was not welcoming more people from Norway, as opposed to Haiti, El Salvador and other African countries.

The White House has also led a almost yearlong campaign to reduce the number of refugees allowed into the United States, as part of broader immigration restriction efforts.

The fallout from alleged vulgar comments President Donald Trump made about immigration from Africa and Haiti continues. She said the fight over immigration reform is turning ugly and seems to counter everything she learned about America in school. "The real White House: Trump calls Haiti and African countries "s***hole" countries to the face of members of Congress and uses Norway to prove his racism", wrote Mr Andreas Wiese, a newspaper commentator.

Trump, who grew up in a Presbyterian family, shot back saying it was "disgraceful" for the pope to question his faith.

Trump reportedly used a vulgarity to describe Haiti and African countries according to several reports. I was very proud of him, it took courage for what he did.

While Trump denied the widely reported comment in a tweet, Senator Dick Durbin of IL, one of the top-ranking Democrats and a longtime supporter of immigration reform, said he "personally heard" the president's comment, and that Trump had repeatedly used "hate-filled, vile and racist" words.

Durbin, who was in the meeting with Trump, told reporters the president did say "these hate-filled things" and repeatedly called African nations "shitholes". Trump's use of the word fulfills both criteria - so Gambitused it in an online headline, as did The New Orleans Advocate (though it later was changed to "s--hole", the same choice made by NOLA.com).

"We are the ones who defeated slavery and freed ourselves in 1804", Aubry said, remarking that until the 1960s black people in the United States were subject to legal segregation from whites.

He said the bill was a step backwards because it would force the United States "to take large numbers of people from high crime countries which are doing badly". Obviously, even dysfunctional places have their talented people who could pass muster under a merit-based system, and we should always have a refugee program for people facing persecution in their home countries.

Trump took particular issue with the characterization of his comments on Haiti.

Botswana's foreign ministry summoned the US ambassador in protest and called the comments "highly irresponsible, reprehensible and racist". But do we really need to spray asterisk sanitizer on a word that 1) everyone knows; 2) is heard on regular cable TV; and 3) was a direct quote from the President of the United States?

"As individual Christians, we have a biblical responsibility to place the needs of others above our own, but as Commander-in-Chief, President Trump has the constitutional responsibility to place the interest of our nation above the needs of other countries". The president denied the report on Friday, but not before lawmakers and staffers in the room confirmed that President Trump, did, indeed, think out loud, "Why do we want all these people from Africa here?"

"We view the utterances by the current American President as highly irresponsible, reprehensible and racist", the government in Gaborone added.

U.S. Congressman Steny Hoyer, a Democrat, said "President Trump's comments are racist and a disgrace".

Utah Senator Orrin Hatch, also a Republican, said he wanted more details of the president's comments.