Do This One Simple Thing to Fall Asleep Faster

Writing a to-do list could provide a new solution to prevent tossing and turning. Listing just 10 tasks you need to achieve over the next few days can help you fall asleep 15 minutes faster neuroscientists have found

Writing a to-do list could provide a new solution to prevent tossing and turning. Listing just 10 tasks you need to achieve over the next few days can help you fall asleep 15 minutes faster neuroscientists have found

Participants stayed in the lab on a week night to avoid weekend effects on bedtime and because on a weekday night, they probably had unfinished tasks to do the next day, Prof Scullin said.

The other group was asked to write about tasks completed during the previous few days.

Data from the participants' sleep studies, including eye movement and brain-wave activity, showed that people who wrote to-do lists fell asleep nine minutes faster than those who wrote about completed tasks.

Those who wrote detailed to-do lists got to sleep 15 minutes quicker than everyone else. One is that writing about the future would lead to increased worry about unfinished tasks and delay sleep, while journaling about completed activities should not trigger worry.

The study of 57 university students, conducted in Baylor's Sleep Neuroscience and Cognition Laboratory, was published in the American Psychological Association's Journal of Experimental Psychology. He suspects that if people were asked to merely think of a to-do list in their head, they'd have much more trouble falling asleep.

Writing a "to-do" list at bedtime may aid in falling asleep, according to a Baylor University study.

The stress of unread emails and incomplete work may explain why people most struggle to fall asleep at the start of the working week. Almost half of people in Britain say stress or worry keeps them awake at night – 54 per cent of women and 40 per cent
The alternative hypothesis is that writing a to-do list will “offload” those thoughts and reduce worry

There are just two schools of thought about that particular."1 is the fact that now talking about the future could lead to increased stress about unfinished activities and wait for sleep, while sourcing about finished activities should perhaps not trigger stress."The alternative hypothesis is that composing a to-do record will "offload" these thoughts and cut back stress" Some 51 percentage of Brits have trouble dropping off to sleep, with women three times more likely to undergo from the findings are printed in the Journal of Experimental Psych".

Half of the people were asked to take five minutes to write down, in bullet points or in paragraph form, "everything you have to keep in mind to do tomorrow and over the next few days", the study authors write.

"The alternative hypothesis is that writing a to-do list will "offload" those thoughts and reduce worry".

Lead author and the study's leader Dr Michael Scullin said that writing the list of things to remember allowed people to "offload" their thoughts - which ultimately reduced their stress, letting them sleep soundly.

Students were instructed they could go to bed at 10:30 p.m., and "we had them in a controlled environment", Scullin said. "It was simply lights out after they got into bed". "We recruited healthy young adults, and so we don't know whether our findings would generalize to patients with insomnia, though some writing activities have previously been suggested to benefit such patients".