By Kieran Gill for the Daily Mail

Video Assistant Referees were used for the first time in English football earlier this week
Credit
Action Images

Video Assistant Referees were used for the first time in English football earlier this week Credit Action Images

It was used by Martin Atkinson for two Chelsea penalty appeals during Wednesday night's Carabao Cup semi-final first leg against Arsenal at Stamford Bridge. "You're balancing all the time: "Let's not re-referee the game; let's keep the flow" versus "Let's get the key situations right".

Atkinson consulted VAR official Neil Swarbrick, based at Premier League headquarters in Stockley Park, after a tussle between Calum Chambers and Cesar Azpilicueta at a first-half corner and no penalty was awarded.

"That is a little bit longer than we have done in training", said Riley.

VAR is limited to four types of match-changing incidents: goals, penalties, straight red cards and mistaken identity.

'We are at the start of the process.

"We're talking around that, reviewing both games this week and coming up with some ideas for next week to make that more effective". Did the player play the ball?

"What is handball can look to you on the field of play if you get one look at it".

Riley is encouraged by its potential but believes a period of scepticism surrounding it is inevitable, and that even when system flaws have been eradicated, imperfections will remain part of the game.

"I'm positive [on VAR] because when there is a big doubt it's right to check the decision".

If Chelsea beat Norwich, their tie with Newcastle United - also on BT Sport 2 - could be another VAR game the following afternoon.

"VAR can actually add value".

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