Scientists captured the super-massive black hole while burping

Researchers noticed that a black hole had produced two'burping events. The pink light shows the latest pulse of high-energy radiation which followed another burp 100,000 years before- the remains of which can be seen as the blue cloud below

Researchers noticed that a black hole had produced two'burping events. The pink light shows the latest pulse of high-energy radiation which followed another burp 100,000 years before- the remains of which can be seen as the blue cloud below

A team of researcher found out that the enormous black hole was taking burp.

Scientists captured images of burping of the black hole and presented it to the American Astronomical Society.

"'Right now, our galaxy's supermassive black hole is firmly in the nap phase of the feast-burp-nap cycle, but it's just waiting for its next meal to come along", Comerford added.

'We know a lot of examples of black holes with single burps emanating out, but we discovered a galaxy with a supermassive black hole that has not one but two burps.

The burp itself consists of a stream of high-energy particles that is kicked back from the black hole. They found that electrons had been stripped from atoms in the cone of gas and surmise that this was caused by a burst of radiation from the vicinity of the black hole.

"Theory predicted that black holes should flicker on and off very quickly and this galaxy's evidence of black holes does flicker on timescales of 100,000 years - which is long in human timescales, but in cosmological timescales is very fast", said Julie Comerford.

The black hole emit huge plumes of bright light from the double-burp. The top arrow indicates the newer burp and the bottom arrow the older one
The black hole emit huge plumes of bright light from the double-burp. The top arrow indicates the newer burp and the bottom arrow the older one

The supermassive black hole at the centre of our own universe will one day arouse from its slumber with a raging appetite.

X-rays from the distant galaxy were detected by the Chandra telescope and later, the Hubble Space Telescope.

Observing these burps could show how when a hungry hole will awaken and begin wolfing down anything unlucky enough to be within sucking distance of its gravitational pull. The black hole living in the middle of a highly bright celestial object is named a quasar. Scientists consider that the black hole exploded the gas twice because it might have two meals at the same time.

The scientists believe there were two burps in quick succession as the black hole consumed two separate "meals" of matter. The researchers suggest that material from the companion galaxy gravitated towards the centre of J1354, providing it with huge amounts of extra material to eat. The scientists point to a collision between J1354 and a neighboring galaxy.

Dr Comerford said that the black hole was going through a cycle of feasting, belching and napping, before starting again.

'If our solar system was very close to the black hole, though, we'd be fried'.