Female priest and another woman fatally stabbed at Tokyo shrine

Police officers walk near the scene of a stabbing incident at Tomioka Hachimangu shrine in Tokyo Friday Dec. 8 2017. Police say three people have died in the stabbing attack on Thursday night at the prominent shrine including the head priest and the

Police officers walk near the scene of a stabbing incident at Tomioka Hachimangu shrine in Tokyo Friday Dec. 8 2017. Police say three people have died in the stabbing attack on Thursday night at the prominent shrine including the head priest and the

One man and one woman were killed and two others injured on Thursday night in a knife attack in Tokyo, local police said.

While Shigenaga was assaulting his sister, another woman - reportedly the attacker's wife - pursued Nagako's driver with a sword.

Shigenaga Tomioka had once served as a priest and the siblings had long quarrelled over shrine affairs, according to local media.

The 58-year-old Nagako was later pronounced dead with a "deep" stab wound to her chest along with a laceration to the back of her neck.

Shigenaga Tomioka, 56, and an accomplice were hiding behind her house, police said.

Police declined to comment on the motive for the killings, but domestic media said the incident appeared to stem from a family feud. Japanese priests generally live on the grounds of their shrines or temples.

Shigenaga's partner, meanwhile, chased down his sister's driver, who had tried to escape on foot, and attacked him about 100 meters away. A trail of splattered blood was still visible on the pavement Friday morning. At a spot about 100 meters away from the vehicle, she slashed his right shoulder, leaving him with a non-life-threatening injury. The brother then appears to have killed his accomplice before taking his own life.

The attacker was the chief priest of the shrine more than a decade ago, but was demoted from the post and succeeded by his sister.

The shrine, established in 1627, is known for its annual Fukagawa Hachiman festival, one of Tokyo's three major festivals from the Edo period. The almost 400-year-old shrine is known for its close ties to sumo and holding one of Tokyo's three big Shinto festivals.