Trump again cites 'military' option against North Korea

Dandong: Chinese tourists are seen on a boat taking them from the Chinese side of the Yalu River for sightseeing close to the shores of North Korea on Thursday.—Reuters

Dandong: Chinese tourists are seen on a boat taking them from the Chinese side of the Yalu River for sightseeing close to the shores of North Korea on Thursday.—Reuters

Trump has often used sharp words to argue that China isn't doing enough to rein in North Korea, and has threatened punitive measures on trade if Xi fails to act.

He added that President Trump was "much more restrained" during a press conference on Friday afternoon, just hours after the "locked and loaded" tweet, but the bold statements continued, including one insisting that the leader of North Korea will "regret it fast" if he "utters one threat" against American territory or allies.

In an editorial on Saturday, North Korea's Minju Joson newspaper said that the USA "finds itself in an ever worsening dilemma, being thrown into the grip of extreme security unrest by the DPRK". The recent UN Security Council unanimous vote for new sanctions suggests that these countries could help.

Sen. Graham also said he doesn't think Trump needs congressional approval to launch a military strike against North Korea, claiming, "There's nothing in the Constitution limiting the ability to use force to protect America".

The visit to the region by President Donald Trump's top military adviser underlines heightened tensions after a week in which North Korea's Kim Jong-Un and the US leader exchanged threats.

Macron also spoke by phone with US President Donald Trump with the aim of "getting North Korea to conform to its worldwide obligations", his Elysee office said. It also said that Trump looked forward to visiting China later this year, calling the relationship between the two leaders "extremely close".

Trump raised alarm around the world - and particularly in Asia - by warning that North Korea would face "fire and fury like the world has never seen" if it were to keep threatening the US. The influence of China in Pyongyang seems to be greatly reduced since Kim Jong Un became the North Korean leader in December 2011.

The comments came after Trump unleashed a slew of fresh threats against North Korea on Friday, declaring the USA military "locked and loaded".

Despite the increasingly bellicose statements, Mr Trump's comments did not appear to be backed by significant military mobilisation on either side of the Pacific, while a discreet diplomatic back channel with the regime is reported to remain open.