Skip lunch line for $100? Florida school accused of 'cafeteria classism'

A Florida school asked poor kids to pay $100 for a front-of-the-line lunch pass

A Florida school asked poor kids to pay $100 for a front-of-the-line lunch pass

The program has, understandably, caused outrage among numerous parents at the school.

Last school year, nearly 7,000 kids in the Polk Co., Florida, got free or reduced lunches, according to the Dept. of Education.

The letter appears to offer the lunch line pass in exchange for a $100 donation, among other tiers of donation rewards.

Attending middle school is rough enough so when Stephenson saw the form in his 6th grader's orientation packet, he went red.

For Chris Stephenson, father of a son who attends sixth grade at the school, it is an issue of privilege.

"(The PTSA) which operates independently from the school financially, however, can not make school decisions without the principal's approval", Brian Andrews, principal of the school, told Fox News.

Students and parents in Lakeland, Florida, were gearing up for another school year when they received a letter from Lawton Chiles Middle Academy saying that for $100, students would be be able to skip the lunch line. "Hey my dad has more money than you I get to eat first you have to wait you have to wait", Stephenson continued. One of the parents shared the letter on Facebook. "You have to wait, you have to wait, '" said Stephenson, imitating the possible teasing and bullying that could come from the fundraising idea.

Andrews told WLFA he did not approve of this fundraiser and he was not aware that sponsor forms for such a fundraiser were inside orientation packets.

"This definitely hits home for me and I am very upset about it", Brian Andrews, the principal of Lawton Chiles Middle Academy said.

The PTSA says the letter ended up in the hands of hundreds of students "due to a clerical error"-saying, "This Family and Business Sponsorship program was explored, but we decided not to implement it".

Stephenson said his problem with the offer isn't just about a student getting his food before somebody else.

"Where were the checkpoints missed, who allowed and approved documents to be distributed to 300 some odd students without having read it?"