Donald Trump needs to clearly denounce white supremacists in Charlottesville — Marco Rubio

GOP senator rips Trump over Charlottesville statement: 'Call evil by its name'

GOP senator rips Trump over Charlottesville statement: 'Call evil by its name'

Trump was more general in his language while Rubio directly condemned Nazis, the KKK and white supremacists.

In another tweet, Gardner stated: "Praying for those hurt & killed today in Charlottesville". He also says "there is no place for this kind of violence in America".

Gardner and other Colorado politicians, including U.S. Sen.

Trump, as a candidate, frequently came under scrutiny for being slow to offer his condemnation of white supremacists. Police would return in full riot gear a short while later and the state's National Guard was put on standby. In comments from Bedminister, N.J., Trump blamed "hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides". Saturday's clashes between white nationalists and counter-protesters have grown so violent the governor has declared a state of emergency and police have ordered people to disperse. After the white nationalists rally in a city park in Charlottesville, counter protesters had gathered. Trump tweeted at 1:19 p.m.

In a series of Twitter posts Saturday, Republican Colorado Senator Cory Gardner called ongoing violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, domestic terrorism and called on U.S. President Donald Trump to likewise call the incident terrorism. He also offered a call for unity among Americans of "all races, creeds and colors".

Democrat Senator Michael Bennet likewise called upon the president to denounce the violent actions.

"We have to come together with love for our nation and true affection for each other", the president said.

For context, keep in mind that these are not back-bench Republicans.

U.S. Rep. Diana DeGette, a Democrat representing Denver, in a tweet said that "domestic terrorism in #Charlottesville must not go unanswered. America we are better than this".

"We ALL must be united & condemn all that hate stands for".

"Do you want the support of these white nationalist groups?"

Utah Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch wrote, "We should call evil by its name. My brother didn't give his life fighting Hitler for Nazi ideas to go unchallenged here at home". He ignored questions from reporters asking if he condemns white supremacy.