Unsafe chemicals detected in macaroni and cheese powder

Is Boxed Mac And Cheese Healthy? Potentially Harmful Chemicals Identified In Popular Brand, Report Says

Is Boxed Mac And Cheese Healthy? Potentially Harmful Chemicals Identified In Popular Brand, Report Says

The chemicals, commonly referred to as plasticizers, are used in raincoats, personal care products, and other items to make them more flexible and harder to break. When it comes to fast food with processed cheese, burgers, Pizzas are all left behind by the delicious pack of mac and cheese.

A new study by the Coalition for Safer Food Processing and Packaging found high levels of potentially harmful chemicals called phthalates in the cheese powder of macaroni and cheese.

The study was published by the Coalition for Safer Food Processing and Packaging, a group of consumers, doctors, scientists, and health advocates.

Known as phthalates, they are already banned from children's teething rings and other toys die to affecting hormones and metabolism.

According to the study, evidence of the chemical was found in 29 of the 30 products tested.

These chemicals are believed to pose a serious threat to the health of pregnant women and children.

When looking at the fat alone, the powdered cheese mix had a concentration of phthalates more than 4 times that of the natural cheeses, and more than 1.5 times the amount in processed cheeses. When doing so, the level of phthalate in a package of powdered cheese was about twice the level in the natural cheeses, and similar to sliced cheese. Phthalate levels were more than four times higher in macaroni and cheese powder.

When trying to estimate how many phthalates we consume and are exposed to overall, Jessie Buckley, assistant professor of environmental health and engineering at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, said it's not clear.

However, despite small amounts being detected in the products, a spokesperson for the Kraft Heinz Company assures the products are safe and no phthalates are added. The presence of such chemicals in the body was attributed to consuming food items packed in plastic.

Kraft denies using the chemicals.