OJ Simpson's parole hearing next week

OJ Simpson in a still from 20/20

OJ Simpson in a still from 20/20

The Nevada parole board has indicated that a decision on Simpson's release will be made the day of the hearing, and that Simpson will be permitted to speak.

Felix, now retired and the author of Guarding The Juice, said Simpson is fearful that the media attention surrounding the parole hearing could hurt his chances of getting out.

Simpson was convicted in 2008 for a botched robbery in Las Vegas and sentenced to 33 years. He has already been granted parole on some of the charges in 2013.

Just like his murder trial, Simpson's parole hearing will likely dominate the airwaves. If that happens, he could be a free man as early as October.

The former football great, with three buddies, grabbed a stash of Simpson memorabilia from a Las Vegas, Nevada, hotel room in 2007. Simpson stood trial in 1995 for the murder of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend, Ron Goldman, but was surprisingly acquitted in one of the most-watched trials in USA history.

Walter Alexander avoided jail time by testifying against Simpson.

"They're looking at the severity of the crime. they're looking at the individual's personal and prior criminal history, they're looking at histories of drug abuse, alcohol abuse" and other factors, said Patton, one of the former parole board chairs.

Simpson will have an opportunity to address the board by video conference as he did during the 2013 hearing.

Simpson's cohort in the crime, Clarence "C.J". The commission usually includes seven members, but now it has only six because a vacancy occurred June 30 and the replacement will not begin until after Simpson's hearing.

Simpson is now being held at the Lovelock Correctional Center.

If the six votes are split, a subsequent parole hearing will be held in January 2018.

Four members from the Nevada Board of Parole Commissioners will consider parole for Simpson at the board offices in Carson City, Nev., with the proceedings set to begin Thursday at 1 p.m. ET. (Nevada holds parole hearings roughly three months ahead of time.) His release would likely come with numerous conditions, and he would nearly certainly be required to check in regularly with a parole officer.

"You have to do what you think is right and not really worry about public opinion", Salling added.