British baby Charlie Gard to be evaluated by United States doctor

The 11-month-old suffers from a rare genetic condition but his parents say claims by his doctors that he is irreparably brain damaged are false

The 11-month-old suffers from a rare genetic condition but his parents say claims by his doctors that he is irreparably brain damaged are false

Specialists at Great Ormond Street Hospital have fought the parents' bid for treatment because they don't think it will help and may cause him pain.

The Telegraph reported that Michio Hirano, a professor of neurology at the Columbia University Medical Center in NY, is scheduled to visit Great Ormond Street Hospital in London on Monday and Tuesday to examine Charlie, who is suffering from a rare genetic condition and is believed to have brain damage.

Michio Hirano, a professor of neurology at the Columbia University Medical Centre in NY, is scheduled to examine Charlie for the first time before discussing his condition with Great Ormond Street doctors and other medical experts.

Charlie, who is 11 months old, has infantile onset encephalomyopathic mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome.

He further noted that the small number of people with Charlie's rare genetic condition, mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, would make robust clinical trials hard.

After much debate in court on Friday over whether Charlie's parents will be present for this, the Judge announced that Yates will be allowed to attend.

They have been fighting to take him to the United States for treatment.

Hirano's visit was organized during a court hearing last week after he testified the treatment was worth a try.

Dr Hirano has said he believes there is now a better chance the treatment would produce a meaningful improvement than there was when he gave evidence three months earlier.

Charlie's parents, who are in their 30s and come from Bedfont, west London, have already lost battles in the High Court, Court of Appeal and Supreme Court in London.

More are scheduled for later this month following this week's gathering of medical experts. The hospital says Charlie should be allowed to die with dignity.

They have also failed to persuade European Court of Human Rights judges to intervene.

Charlie Gard, the terminally ill baby suffering from a rare mitochondrial disease, is at the centre of a legal tussle.