'No doubt' over Britain leaving EU: Brexit minister Davis

Britain's negotiations with the European Union over its exit from the bloc begin on Monday and stand to be complicated by the surprise loss of Prime Minister Theresa May's parliamentary majority in a national election last week.

The arch-federalist former Belgian PM, who this year published a book calling on EU states to forge "a more flawless Union", warned last week Britain could lose its rebate and opt-outs if it changes its mind and decides to stay.

A day after France and Germany both said Britain could reverse Brexit if it wanted, Verhofstadt said Britain's budget rebates and opt outs from European Union rules would disappear if it did so.

An early election this month, in which Prime Minister Theresa May lost her majority, only added to the problems.

In an attempt to fight back over repeated reports over the Northern Ireland right-wing party's views on social issues, the party hopes to form a deal with the Conservatives.

The government is due to present its legislative programme at the opening of parliament on Wednesday, which will be followed by a key confidence vote several days later.

So far more than 2,000 people have signed up for the Women's March On Downing Street Against The DUP, in London, and the Love Quality NI's March for Civil Marriage Equality, in Belfast. But the government will double the length of the session to let lawmakers debate Britain's approach to Brexit without interruption.

The Times also reported that party members who had campaigned to keep Britain in the European Union were likely to have a candidate lined up to replace May, with interior minister Amber Rudd the likely option.

Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson, who is newly influential after winning 13 seats in Scotland, has said Britain should prioritise "freedom to trade and our economic growth".

With her strategy unclear and her position insecure, Prime Minister Theresa May plunges this week into tortuous divorce talks with the European Union that will shape Britain's prosperity and global influence for generations to come.

Jean-Claude Juncker: The European Commission president will not be directly involved in talks and his spokesman has said he is unlikely to spend more than half an hour a week on Brexit.

But Hammond said transitional arrangements would be necessary, to give business greater certainty.

But he added: "It's a statement of common sense that if we are going to radically change the way we work together, we need to get there via a slope, not a cliff edge".

Days after a suggestion from French President Emmanuel Macron that Britain could still choose to remain, Davis said there would be no backtracking from Prime Minister Theresa May's plan to deliver on Brexit, for which Britons voted in a referendum nearly a year ago.

Ahead of talks kicking off tomorrow in Brussels, Philip Hammond said he felt the build up to discussions represented "the most egregious pre-negotiation process I've seen for a while". They also have a strong incentive to deny the United Kingdom a deal so attractive it might encourage others to follow the British example.

If Britain fails to agree a deal and really does fall out of the European Union without reaching consensus, then there is no knowing what will happen.

The DUP leader said: "There's been a lot of commentary around the issues that we are talking about and it won't surprise anyone that we are talking about matters that pertain, of course, to the nation generally".

The Sunday Times said ministers within May's cabinet had "let it be known" they would oust the prime minister if they thought she could not pass the government's legislative program in a vote expected on June 28.