Corbyn and May trade blows as election campaigns begin

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May speaks to the media outside 10 Downing Street in central London Britain

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May speaks to the media outside 10 Downing Street in central London Britain

Labour leader Corbyn welcomed May's calls for an early election, however, saying it will "give the British people the chance to vote for a government that will put the interests of the majority first".

But Corbyn said the debate should not be about Brexit but about the battle between "the Conservatives, the party of privilege and the richest, versus the Labour party, the party that is standing up for working people".

It came as Mr Corbyn promised to "prove the Establishment experts wrong" and win the election, despite a fresh Times/YouGov opinion poll putting Labour 24 points behind the Tories.

Corbyn said his party was not intimidated by the groups that were hoarding the UK's money and insisted he would make sure everyone paid their taxes, Efe news reported.

Theresa May on Tuesday announced she wanted to hold a snap general election on June 8, despite months of saying one would create risky instability.

The Prime Minister gave a short speech in a parish hall in Walmsley, a village in the Labour target seat of Bolton North East, as the scramble for votes begins hours after MPs voted to clear the way for the June 8 poll.

Labour's job is to make life hard for her government, to hold it to account and offer a credible alternative to the electorate.

Corbyn, who plans to namecheck Southern rail, Arcadia boss Sir Philip Green and Sports Direct founder Mike Ashley, will vow to "overturn the rigged system".

Mr Munro added: "There is a proven track record over two elections and two referendums that debates reach huge audiences including a lot of young people who don't watch conventional political coverage in great numbers".

The latest in a line of polls taken after the snap general election announcement shows that the ruling Conservative party looks unbeatable right now.

It comes after shadow chancellor John McDonnell on Wednesday said the Government should "put the deal to Parliament and possibly to the country overall".

But why this gloomy spirit in the Labour Party?

She also said a strong mandate for her as Prime Minister and her plan to take Britain out of the European Union would strengthen the United Kingdom in the negotiations with the EU.

He will add: "These rules have created a cosy cartel which rigs the system in favour of a few powerful and wealthy individuals and corporations".

"The Prime Minister says we have a stronger economy, yet she can't explain why people's wages are lower today than they were 10 years ago or why more households are in debt, six million people earning less than the minimum wage, child poverty is up, pensioner poverty is up".

After the speech, a spokeswoman for the leader said Labour's position, backing a "meaningful vote" in Parliament, had not changed but did not explicitly rule out a second referendum. They think there are rules in politics, which if you don't follow by doffing your cap to powerful people, accepting that things can't really change, then you can't win.

By voting for Article 50 but refusing to rule out a second referendum, the party risks upsetting voters on both sides of the Brexit divide.