North Korea threatens 'all out war'

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence looks at the North side from Observation Post Ouellette in the Demilitarized Zone, near the border village of Panmunjom which has separated the two Koreas since the Korean War South Korea Monday

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence looks at the North side from Observation Post Ouellette in the Demilitarized Zone, near the border village of Panmunjom which has separated the two Koreas since the Korean War South Korea Monday

The DPRK has never begged for peace but is prepared to take tough countermeasures in order to defend itself with its military might and to move down the pathway it has chosen for itself, Kim said adding that Pyongyang was going to bring the USA to account for aftermaths of the Americans' actions.

The North regularly launches short-range missiles, but is also developing mid-range and long-range missiles meant to target USA troops in Asia and, eventually, the US mainland. North Korea's nuclear and missile development dominated the agenda on his first stop in South Korea.

Koh Yu-hwan, a North Korea expert at Seoul's Dongguk University, said that the way US officials describe "maximum pressure and engagement" suggests that the Trump administration wants to ease Chinese fears about a collapse in North Korea, something that prevented Beijing from aggressively pressuring the North in the past.

Pence reassured Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Tuesday that the US considers its alliance with Japan to be a cornerstone of security in the region.

Pence told reporters near the DMZ that President Donald Trump was hopeful that China would use its "extraordinary levers" to pressure the North to abandon its weapons program, a day after the North's failed missile launch.

Trump campaigned on an "America First" pledge, promising to overhaul trade agreements that he said hurt U.S.jobs.

Recently, Pyongyang has been alarmed by the United States deployment of the THAAD missile system in South Korea in early March.

Like South Korea, Japan already faces a direct threat from the secretive regime.

The White House foreign policy adviser traveling with Pence told reporters that the type of missile that North Korea tried to fire on Sunday was medium-range, and that it exploded about 4 to 5 seconds after it was launched. As March wound down, Pyongyang once again went back to its engine tests - technology that could possibly be used in an eventual ICBM. He will aim to reassure allies in South Korea and Japan that the USA will take appropriate steps to defend them against North Korean aggression. Trump, in the presence of Xi Jinping, announced that he struck a blow on Syria.

North Korea could react to a potential U.S. strike by targeting South Korea or Japan, and officials in both countries have been ill at ease with the more bellicose language deployed by President Donald Trump's administration.

Shortly after, North Korea issued a forceful response to the deployment of a U.S. naval strike group, including the 97,000-ton aircraft carrier, the USS Carl Vinson, to the region April 10, saying it would counter "reckless acts of aggression" with "whatever methods the USA wants to take". The high-profile failure came as the North tried to showcase its nuclear and missile capabilities around the birth anniversary of the North's late founder and as a US aircraft carrier neared the Korean Peninsula.

Meanwhile, the U.S. waded again into military action, dropping a GBU-43/B Massive Ordnance Air Blast Bomb (MOAB), the United States military's largest non-nuclear weapon, on an ISIS hideout in Afghanistan, the first time this type of weapon has been used in battle, according to USA officials.

The following day, April 16, another attempted missile launch by the Kim regime failed, United States and South Korean defense officials told CNN.

From the wind-swept deck of a massive aircraft carrier, Vice President Mike Pence on Wednesday warned North Korea not to test the resolve of the US military, promising it would make an "overwhelming and effective" response to any use of conventional or nuclear weapons.

North Korea's United Nations deputy representative, Kim In Ryong, responded, warning that the USA actions and rhetoric have "created a unsafe situation in which thermonuclear war may break out at any moment on the peninsula and poses a serious threat to world peace and security".